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Busting the Myths of the ODD Child

The Surprising Technique That Turns Opposition on Its Head

James Levine • 4/27/2017 • No Comments

By James Levine - Children diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) inspire many myths. School personnel and even parents believe that these children enjoy frustrating others and are impossible to teach. But children with chronically oppositional behavior typically are unaccustomed to articulating their needs, wants, and experiences in problem-solving ways. Here's how a collaborative approach to therapy can make all the difference.

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The Ride Home

A Special Feature from Our Family Matters Department

David Treadway • 4/27/2017 • No Comments

With his father's help, a young therapist contemplates the biggest gamble of his life.

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VIDEO: Bill Doherty on Becoming a "Citizen Therapist"

How to Have a Conversation About Politics in Therapy

William Doherty • 4/26/2017 • No Comments

In the following clip from his Symposium Keynote address, William Doherty offers an expanded vision of therapy and explains why clinicians are uniquely suited to serving as “connectors and trust-builders” to address the stress and anxiety many clients—and therapists—are feeling in the current political climate.

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Reframing the "Burden" of Caretaking

Why Accepting Help is Empowering for Those Receiving and Giving

Barry Jacobs • 4/25/2017 • No Comments

By Barry Jacobs - For those who've spent their lifetimes taking pride in giving generously to others, suddenly being on the receiving end of care because of illness or age-related infirmity can be tormenting. For many, rejecting help is regarded as a measure of one's courage and determination in battling family crises brought on by old age or disease. Here are some ways of overcoming this common tendency to refuse help.

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Keeping it Real with Your Teen Clients

...And the One Mistake Too Many Clinicians Make

Janet Sasson Edgette • 4/24/2017 • No Comments

By Janet Sasson Edgette - For many teenagers, few things are less appealing than the prospect of talking with adults. Can you blame them? Too often, adults quickly refashion conversations into know-it-all lectures, boring monologues, or annoying reprimands. Here are some approaches to building conversation that allow you to connect with young clients without making them feel self-conscious, pounced upon, or called out.

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Practicing Whole Body Psychotherapy

...And What It Means to "Start a Journey" with Your Client

James Gordon • 4/20/2017 • 1 Comment

By James Gordon - A spiritual perspective informs my work from my first moments with each person. Not an explicit religious orientation, this perspective encompasses an appreciation for the yet unrevealed potential of each person, a sense of sacred connection within each of us to something larger than ourselves, and moments of inexplicable grace, which can transform each person's work with me and on their own.

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VIDEO: Stephen Porges on the Building Blocks of Healthy Relationships

What Co-regulation Actually Looks Like

Stephen Porges • 4/19/2017 • 7 Comments

In developing the Polyvagal Theory, psychophysiologist Stephen Porges transformed the way therapists understand the underlying mechanisms of traumatic response and how safety, caring, and trustworthiness are conveyed unconsciously in our body language, voice tonality, facial expression, and eye contact. In this video clip, he explains what healthy co-regulation looks like in the body.

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The Immigrant's Odyssey

Acknowledging Losses and Celebrating Victories

Priska Imberti • 4/18/2017 • No Comments

By Priska Imberti - Today, therapists are much more likely than they were decades ago to take into consideration the ways that race, class, gender, and culture powerfully affect individual psychology and family relationships. However, we still tend to neglect exploring the various immigration experiences to discover how they’ve transformed the inner world of our immigrant clients. Only by understanding their aspirations and validating the difficulties of their journey can we help them heal.

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What Makes Couples Therapy Techniques Stick?

Three Ways to Replicate Progress Outside the Consulting Room

Carolyn Daitch • 4/18/2017 • No Comments

By Carolyn Daitch - We not only have to teach our clients how to interrupt old coping mechanisms, generated by fear and anger, but also how to integrate new coping skills permanently into their response repertoire. Successfully combating and overriding firmly ingrained behaviors in this manner requires practice, and it's our job as therapists to help clients learn how and when to practice these skills, and then make sure they go home and do it.

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How to Have a Conversation About Race

Learning to See Through the Myth of "Otherness"

Ken Hardy • 4/17/2017 • No Comments

By Ken Hardy - The creation of "the other" is the dynamic at the heart of divorce and personal antagonisms, and it has always been central to racism, sexism, homophobia, and ethnic persecution. To do therapy well, we must learn to see through the myth of otherness: we must recognize that all people, no matter how flawed, have redeemable capacities in their being.

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