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10 Best-Ever Anxiety-Management Techniques

There are Effective Alternatives to Medication

Margaret Wehrenberg • 5/1/2016 • No Comments

By Margaret Wehrenberg - The sensations of doom or dread or panic felt by anxiety sufferers are truly overwhelming--the very same sensations, in fact, that a person would feel if the worst really were happening. Here are a few anxiety-management techniques that can offer relief, and offer it quickly.

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10 Best-Ever Anxiety-Management Techniques

There are Effective Alternatives to Medication

Margaret Wehrenberg • 9/28/2014 • 3 Comments

The sensations of doom or dread or panic felt by anxiety sufferers are truly overwhelming. But what clients don't know when they start taking meds is the unacknowledged cost of relying solely on pills: they'll never learn some basic methods that can control or eliminate their symptoms without meds. A therapist armed with methods for addressing these clusters can offer her anxious client the promise of relief for a lifetime, if she knows which of these "10 best" techniques work for which symptoms, and how to use them.

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10 Best-Ever Anxiety-Management Techniques

There are Effective Alternatives to Medication

Margaret Wehrenberg • 11/11/2014 • 5 Comments

The sensations of doom or dread and other common panic attack symptoms felt by anxiety sufferers are truly overwhelming. They’re the very same sensations a person would feel if the worst really were happening. What good psychiatrist would suggest skipping medication when a suffering patient can get anxiety relief quickly? But what clients don’t know when they start taking medication is the unacknowledged cost of relying solely on pills: they’ll never learn the basic mind-body stress-reduction techniques that can control or eliminate their symptoms without meds.

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20 Weeks of Happiness

Can a Course in Positive Psychology Change Your Life?

Richard Handler • 10/18/2014 • No Comments

Today, Positive Psychology, as popularized by former American Psychological Association president and bestselling author Martin Seligman, is taking folk wisdom and Greek philosophy, mixing them with solid contemporary research on joy, optimism, satisfaction, contentment, forgiveness, and gratitude, and popularizing the result as scientifically validated fact. The result, they hope, will be a new take on psychology, at once Victorian and scientific.

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A Black Therapist in America

Speaking Out against Learned Voicelessness

Ken Hardy • 11/17/2016 • 3 Comments

By Kenneth Hardy - My own clinical work has become centered on issues like the anatomy of racial rage, learned voicelessness, and an array of other invisible wounds of racial oppression. But after all these years, I still have my own untold stories.

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A Brain Science Approach to Couples Therapy

Using Brain Science in Therapy to Alter Mood States

Brent Atkinson • 2/26/2015 • No Comments

When clients become upset, they're in the grip of one of seven major body-brain mood states, also referred to as "executive operating systems." These are more than just passing moods. They're complex neurochemical cascades, in which hormones race through the body and brain and electrical impulses fly over familiar neural synapses, shaping what we feel, do, and think. This hormonal cascade can be lifesaving in the appropriate situation---in the face of a dangerous driver, say, or a possible mugger or rapist. But in intimate relationships, it's often toxic. In my work as a couples therapist, I train my clients to reactivate the neocortex---the inner switchmaster---in the face of strong emotion.

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A Brain Science Strategy for Overwriting Traumatic Memories

Creating Juxtaposition Experiences to Relieve Trauma Symptoms

Bruce Ecker • 11/10/2015 • 3 Comments

What we clinicians have learned in recent years about the intricacies of the brain's implicit memory systems has certainly helped us better recognize the linkage between distressing or traumatic experiences and many of the previously puzzling symptoms clients bring to our offices. But now brain science is beginning ...

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A Breathing Exercise Regimen for Anxiety Disorders

Unlocking the Power of Deep Breathing to Combat Panic Attacks

Graham Cambell • 4/2/2015 • No Comments

Anxiety attacks anything and everything in a person's life. Sometimes the targets are the mundane activities that others take for granted. At other times, it attacks more fundamental functions, such as one's ability to work or to love. We are used to thinking of people who are afraid to speak in public or to drive across a bridge as anxious. We are all familiar with a few stereotypical worrywarts. But anxiety influences a much broader range of behaviors. To the ordinary observer, people who are rude in a restaurant, obnoxious at their child's soccer game or overly exacting of their employees might seem simply self-centered. But often, these individuals are dealing with a wide variety of inner phantoms.

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A Business Plan for Growing Your Therapy Practice

Entrepreneurial and Advertising Tips for the Psychotherapist

Joe Bavonese • 2/4/2015 • 4 Comments

I've read that you have to spend money to make money. But I'm not Donald Trump: I'm just a good clinician. Why isn't that enough? Why do I have to spend more money? Didn't I spend enough in graduate school? It seems crazy to have gone through all those years of training only to end up here: scared, risk averse, confused, and unsure what to do next to grow my practice. But if you're serious about being successful in your private practice and helping more people, investing money and time will reward you handsomely for the rest of your career.

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A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Solution for Losing Weight

Judith Beck on Why CBT Could Be Your Best Weight Loss Strategy

Judith Beck • 8/11/2015 • 4 Comments

Why is it so difficult to lose weight and keep it off? From the viewpoint of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), the reason isn’t hard to find: knowing what to do and knowing how to get yourself to do it are entirely separate skills. When it comes to changing behavior, especially long-term, habitual patterns, getting yourself to do something different, even when you know it’s good for you, depends largely on what you tell yourself: that is, on your thinking. Outlined here is a program I’ve developed for nonpsychiatric (and noneating-disordered) individuals that utilizes the basic principles of CBT to address overeating directly.

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