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When Trauma Impacts Performance

A Brainspotting Cure for the "Yips"

David Grand

By David Grand - One of the most common athletic performance blocks I treat is the loss by an accomplished athlete of an ability to perform a seemingly simple task that was once almost automatic. It’s primarily a sports concept, but it can be found in all walks of life. I’ve found that the medical treatment is usually ineffective. Instead, I believe symptoms can more accurately be understood as a form of trauma-based dissociation.

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VIDEO: Dan Siegel on the Therapist's Mission in the Modern Age

Attending to How We Relate to Each Other and the Planet

Dan Siegel

In this video clip from his 2015 Networker Symposium Keynote address, "Healing and Hope in the Human Age," psychiatrist and bestselling author Dan Siegel explores how human consciousness can evolve to meet the unprecedented challenges we face on a planet we're altering in ways never before contemplated.

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Pinpointing Suicidality with Brain Science

Can the Brains of the Dead Give Hope to the Living?

Charles Barber

By Charles Barber - For the last three decades, Victoria Arango has been studying the brains of people who committed suicide, and has discovered that the biochemistry of their brains differs significantly from that of people who don't commit suicide.

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The Merits of Applying Brain Science in Therapy

Using the Brain to Explain Fear and Anxiety Objectively

Louis Cozolino

The aspects of our brains that evolved 50,000 years ago—which give us astonishing powers of thought, logic, imagination, empathy, and morality—also share skull space with the ancient brain equipment that we've inherited from our mammalian and reptilian forebears over the past several million years, including the neural circuitry involved in fear and anxiety. Some therapists bristle at the integration of neuroscience and psychotherapy, calling it irrelevant or reductionistic. But information about the brain and how it evolved helps us communicate with clients about their problems in an objective and non-shaming manner. It's hard to grasp how the brain could be irrelevant to changing the mind.

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Improving Therapy Through Song, Mindfulness, and Self-Care

Testimonials from the 2015 Psychotherapy Networker Symposium

Symposium Student Scholars

I attended the Networker Symposium's Creativity Day because I figured I might take a couple interesting facts home with me or meet a few nice people the day before the large crowds came for the conference. I was pleasantly surprised at how incredible the Symposium was from the very second that Creativity Day started. From the traditional African music to the wonderful choreography on stage, I was energized for the day to begin. By the time I saw Jon Kabat-Zinn, I was inspired. I was blown away by how personable and intellectual he was with regard to mindfulness, along with how well he was able to translate his knowledge to the crowd.

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Applying the Brakes

In Trauma Treatment, Safety is Essential

Babette Rothschild

My approach to trauma work is rooted in an experience I had in college. A friend asked me to teach her to drive--in a new car my father had just given me. Sitting in the passenger seat next to her as she prepared to turn on the ignition, I suddenly panicked. I quickly realized that before I taught her how to make that powerful machine go, I had to make sure that she knew how to put on the brakes. I apply the same principle to therapy, especially trauma therapy. I never help clients call forth traumatic memories unless I and my clients are confident that the flow of their anxiety, emotion, memories, and body sensations can be contained at will.

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Creating Lasting Change with Brain Science

A Mindful Approach With Couples

Brent Atkinson

Over the years, I’ve come to recognize that there’s no one-shot, magic-bullet approach to retraining the human brain. Instead, I’ve developed a process that systematically combines what we know about the power of the emotional brain, the particular strengths of the rational mind, the mechanics of mindfulness meditation, and the brain’s impressive flexibility to help clients learn to calm their nervous systems and navigate their lives more effectively.

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Why We Focus on the Negative

Symposium 2014 Presenter Rick Hanson Explains the Evolution of the Negativity Bias

Rich Simon

Much can be made of the power of positive thinking, but the real question is, why do we tend toward the negative in the first place?

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The Triune Brain: Three Brains Attempting to Work as One

How the Evolution of the Human Brain has Led to the Existence of the Triune Brain

Louis Cozolino

When thinking about the general evolution of humans, we primarily compare ourselves to our chimp-like ancestors. But when it comes to the specific evolution of the human brain we must share skull space with the ancient brain equipment that we’ve inherited from our mammalian and reptilian forebears over the past several million years.

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How the Brain’s Negativity Bias Impedes Change

Rick Hanson On Understanding Why We Focus On The Negative

Rich Simon

The common link between therapy and brain science is pretty simple: Change. So how can we, as therapists, help to facilitate that brain change?

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