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September Quandary: Will a No-Suicide Contract Help My Client Stay Safe?

Four Clinicians Weigh In

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - A new clinician is working with a client who’s expressed some suicidality at times. She's worried about him and thinks it might be a good idea to have him sign a no-suicide contract, but she's heard mixed things about them and isn't sure what to do. Here, four therapists offer their advice.

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Is Antidepressant Ketamine a Game-Changer?

Despite Its Growing Popularity, Some Therapists are Cautious

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - In just a few years, the number of clinics administering ketamine, an anesthetic-turned-antidepressant, has spiked rapidly. After about six ketamine infusions, 70 to 80 percent of participants with treatment-resistant depression no longer experience symptoms, and usually within hours. But despite the hype, some therapists are recommending caution.

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VIDEO: The Mindful Path Out Of Depression

Zindel Segal on Helping Clients Take The First Step

Zindel Segal

What’s happening when a client suffering from symptoms of depression is willing to follow the therapist’s voice with eyes closed? According to Zindel Segal—expert on mood disorders—that simple act is a commitment to choicefulness and a first step towards shifting the perceptions that make depression so hard to shake.

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Ketamine: Leading the New Wave of Antidepressants?

Fast-Acting Party Drug Could be in the Pipeline for Depression Treatment

Chris Lyford

Since it was introduced as an anesthetic in the 1970s, ketamine has occupied an uncertain pharmacological status. It’s been used as both a Vietnam-era battlefield painkiller and an illicit party drug, better known as Special K. But recent findings in studies around the world have some researchers wondering whether it might be the silver bullet for depression that Prozac and its sidekicks never turned out to be.

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The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach to Overcoming Depression

Judith Beck Explains Her Method of Depression Treatment

Judith Beck

The hallmark of cognitive therapy is understanding clients’ reactions—emotional and behavioral—in terms of how they interpret situations. The repeated themes in people’s thinking and behavior finally make sense once we understand the basic way they view themselves, their world, and other people. But cognitive therapy goes beyond helping people understand their thoughts and behaviors in sessions. People actually get better by making small changes in their thinking and behavior every day. As therapy progresses, homework assignments and relapse prevention become essential parts of the approach.

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When Depressed Clients Blame Themselves

Elisha Goldstein on Treating Depression with Self-Compassion

Rich Simon

While the source of physical wounds can usually be easily identified, the cause of emotional wounds are often hidden and hard to recognize, leading many depressed clients to assume they’re responsible for their own pain and therefore their suffering isn’t legitimate.

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What Type of Depression is It?

Margaret Wehrenberg on Working with Low-Energy Depressed Clients

Rich Simon

The techniques you might employ to help a quiet avoider client dealing with depression won't work with a panicky depressive client, so identifying the type of depression you're working with is imperative.

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