Archives

Sort by:

Coping and Learning After a Client's Suicide

A Therapist Reflects on What He Might Have Done Differently

Frank Pittman • 9/7/2017 • 2 Comments

By Frank Pittman - I've been in full-time private practice for almost 30 years. In that time, three patients in my practice killed themselves. Each suicide has left me shell-shocked and questioning my therapeutic attitudes and methods. I did not expect Adam to be one of my casualties.

Read more...

Got "Flow"?

Six Self-Hypnosis Guidelines to Create Lasting Change in Yourself

Douglas Flemons • 6/23/2017 • No Comments

By Douglas Flemons - Got flow? As a psychotherapist specializing in hypnosis, I work at times with elite performers—people who've spent long years learning and honing a skill that they can carry out with precision and grace. Except when they can't. Except when, with their mind and body out of sync, they lose concentration, coordination, and confidence.

Read more...

Adjusting the Unconscious

What if a Few Basic Principles Could Make Change Far Easier?

Steve Andreas • 4/10/2017 • 2 Comments

By Steve Andreas - What if there were a few basic principles and methods that make therapeutic change far simpler and easier than most people think is possible? Not only is this possible, but there’s already a coherent body of knowledge and practice to guide us in eliciting change in the moment, confirmed by longer-term follow-up in the real world. Here are seven practical principles for making sense out of the case study that follows.

Read more...

How To Become Your Best Self

A Story About Commitment to Changing Your Habits

Katy Butler • 12/30/2016 • No Comments

By Katy Butler - In earlier centuries, before the factory siren drowned out the village church bells, systems of human transformation were embedded within local religious life. Today, in a culture freed from communal rhythms, our habits of the heart are nearly forgotten. In this postmodern world of infinite choice and incoherent structure, what practical steps should we take now to become our best selves?

Read more...

The Golden Rule of Habit Change

Expert Lessons on Being Productive in Life and Business

Ryan Howes • 10/14/2016 • 2 Comments

By Ryan Howes - We may think of certain aspects of our practice as being a stamp of our particular therapeutic approach and style, but at times, the line between stable and stuck-in-a-rut can become a bit blurry. So we turned to New York Times journalist Charles Duhigg, author of the bestseller The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business to see if he’d share how his findings may help us therapists, both personally and professionally.

Read more...

Breaking the Isolation of Caretaking

Three Ways to Help Clients Cope with the Challenges of Alzheimer’s

Nancy Kriseman • 9/28/2016 • No Comments

By Nancy Kriseman - The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans affected by dementia are over the age 65, which makes the vast majority members of what’s called the traditionalist generation. Understanding this generation’s entrenched values and how they can affect their coping and your intervention can facilitate better outcomes. It’s important never to underestimate how validating and normalizing the caretaker’s experience can foster resilience and inspire hope.

Read more...

Appreciating the Strengths and Contributions of Introverts

Author Susan Cain Explains the Link Between Solitude and Creativity

Ryan Howes • 8/19/2016 • No Comments

By Ryan Howes - More often than not, we tend to give preference to the people we see as more social, gregarious, and comfortable in the limelight and in crowds. But according to Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, maybe it’s time the world came to appreciate the strengths and contributions of the 50 percent of Americans who are introverts.

Read more...

The Power of the Enneagram as a Therapy Tool

A System for Tapping into Clients' Unconscious Beliefs and Patterns

David Daniels • 5/18/2016 • 1 Comment

By David Daniels - As a clinician, the typology that I’ve found most helpful in organizing my own work and understanding the most enduring lifelong patterns in my clients’ lives is the Enneagram, a system of personality types. When we can witness, or self-observe, our own habit of mind and its repetitive, limiting pattern in a nonjudgmental way with gratitude---which this system facilitates---we gain great leverage in changing our patterns.

Read more...

The Healing Power of Therapeutic Crying

How Crying in the Therapy Room Can Bring About Big Changes

Jeffrey Von Glahn • 4/26/2016 • 4 Comments

By Jeffrey Von Glahn - Too often these days, I find that many clinicians are unaware of the difference between clients’ therapeutic crying and situations in which clients are forced to deal with an overwhelming incident that takes them beyond their coping capacity and makes them feel vulnerable. Just a minute or two of deep therapeutic crying can bring about profound changes. And facilitating therapeutic crying isn’t a complicated process. Most of the time, the less the therapist does, the better.

Read more...

Creating Therapeutic Changes That Last

Why Changing Clients' Habits is Key to Making Therapy Stick

Steven Stosny • 3/17/2016 • No Comments

By Steven Stosny - With the exception of saints and literary characters, enduring change rarely happens as the result of being knocked off our feet by a spiritual or psychological whack upside the head. Perdurable change is gradual and mundane. It occurs by extending, supplementing, and altering the habits that shape perspectives and drive behavior. First comes the hard work; then comes the epiphany.

Read more...

Page 1 of 2 (16 Blog Posts)