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When Money Comes Up in Therapy

Two Ways to Make Your Fee Policies Clear and Easy to Talk About

Lynne Stevens • 3/16/2018 • 2 Comments

By Lynne Stevens - Most therapists were never coached about how to reconcile the closeness of the therapeutic encounter with the fact that therapy is also a business. It has taken me years to understand that therapy is not separate from the exchange of money. I am in this profession because I care and have skills and knowledge that can help, and I also need to make a living.


Is Sport Psychology a New Clinical Direction For You?

An Opportunity to Expand Your Practice

Mitchell Greene • 10/27/2017 • No Comments

By Mitchell Greene - There are plenty of similarities between my clinical and sport psychology work. Like any group, however, athletes have their own lingo, culture, rituals, and lifestyle. Understanding the ins and outs of them can give you a leg up on establishing rapport, trust, and mutual understanding.


Getting "Ghosted" by Clients

Four Stories from Therapists, and What They Learned from Their Experience

Chris Lyford • 7/8/2017 • 2 Comments

By Chris Lyford - We've all seen it happen. Maybe some of us are even guilty of it ourselves: Sometimes it's easier to simply ignore people than respond when they reach out. But this disappearing act, or "ghosting" as it's become commonly known, also happens to therapists quite often. Here, four clinicians share their stories.


Finding (and Marketing) Your Therapy Passion

3 Ways to Define Your Niche and Clarify Your Practice

Dick Anderson • 6/27/2017 • 1 Comment

By Dick Anderson - Defining your niche is an essential exercise for everyone, novice or experienced, who intends to market a product or service. Ironically, most of us haven't been encouraged to think through what makes us unique in our profession. Here are three suggestions to keep in mind when considering what's special about you and your services.


The Cult of DSM

Ending Our Allegiance to the Great Gazoo

Gary Greenberg • 3/23/2017 • No Comments

By Gary Greenberg - Written just after the release of DSM-5, this masterfully sardonic look at the diagnostic charade many practitioners play argued that it was finally time to take the dissatisfaction with DSM seriously and find an alternative to an increasingly empty ritual.


Lessons from a Mind in Decline

What Do You Tell Your Clients...and Yourself?

David Treadway • 12/1/2016 • 13 Comments

By David Treadway - Many of us of a certain age live with the fear of early-onset dementia, cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s—call it what you will. But incrementally becoming a vacant body to be tended, fed, changed, pitied was my worst nightmare.


A Black Therapist in America

Speaking Out against Learned Voicelessness

Ken Hardy • 11/17/2016 • 3 Comments

By Kenneth Hardy - My own clinical work has become centered on issues like the anatomy of racial rage, learned voicelessness, and an array of other invisible wounds of racial oppression. But after all these years, I still have my own untold stories.


What Makes Psychotherapy Fulfilling?

The Keys to Maintaining Positive Work Morale and Clinical Passion

Barry Duncan • 11/4/2016 • 3 Comments

By Barry Duncan - It’s no secret to anybody in our field that this is a tough time to be a therapist. In public agencies, we’re underpaid, overworked, and held to unattainable “productivity standards." So why would anybody choose to enter such a field? Recent findings reveal that therapists stay in the profession not because of material rewards or the prospect of professional advancement, but because they value connecting deeply with clients and helping them to improve.


The Golden Rule of Habit Change

Expert Lessons on Being Productive in Life and Business

Ryan Howes • 10/14/2016 • 2 Comments

By Ryan Howes - We may think of certain aspects of our practice as being a stamp of our particular therapeutic approach and style, but at times, the line between stable and stuck-in-a-rut can become a bit blurry. So we turned to New York Times journalist Charles Duhigg, author of the bestseller The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business to see if he’d share how his findings may help us therapists, both personally and professionally.


The Essential Tasks of Brief Therapy

Meeting Treatment Goals in Just Eight Sessions

Robert Taibbi • 9/7/2016 • 1 Comment

By Robert Taibbi - We all know the essential tasks of the first session in any kind of therapy: building rapport and a sense of collaboration, assessing and diagnosing, and formulating and offering a preliminary treatment plan. The tasks in brief therapy aren't different, but they're done in less time--meaning that therapists need to get to work immediately, and there's little leeway for mistakes.


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