Blog Archives

Sort by:

The Brené Brown Approach to Being Enough

The Power of Embracing Our Vulnerability

By Mary Sykes Wylie - A pervasive sense of shame makes many of us feel unworthy of human connection. Why the shame? Because in this perfectionistic culture, most of us believe we’re “not good enough." Professor and acclaimed TED speaker Brené Brown says that some people have escaped the shame trap. How? They let themselves be vulnerable.

Daily Blog

September Quandary: Will a No-Suicide Contract Help My Client Stay Safe?

Four Clinicians Weigh In

A new clinician is working with a client who’s expressed some suicidality at times. She's worried about him and thinks it might be a good idea to have him sign a no-suicide contract, but she's heard mixed things about them and isn't sure what to do. Here, four therapists offer their advice.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Esther Perel on Speaking About Sex

Getting Comfortable in Couples Therapy

Many traditional approaches to couples therapy are built on the assumption that if you help a couple clear up the emotional issues in their relationship, sex will automatically get better. . . . But it doesn’t seem to work that way.

Daily Blog

Treating Children with OCD

The Essential Component

By Lynn Lyons - OCD, like other anxiety disorders, is like a cult leader, demanding acceptance of a skewed view of reality. Including parents in therapy with their kids who suffer from it demystifies the disorder and allows them to be part of a family plan to deal with it.

Daily Blog

Burnout Reconsidered

What Supershrinks Can Teach Us

By Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and ⁠Françoise Mathieu - An entire industry has sprung up to address the problem of compassion fatigue, but research indicates that the most commonly proposed answer, improved self-care, doesn’t work. In fact, the study of the most highly effective clinicians suggests that burnout isn’t related to caring too much, but continuing to care ineffectively.

Daily Blog

Learning to Bear the Unbearable

How MDMA Works

By Bessel van der Kolk and Rich Simon - As a researcher and outspoken advocate for therapeutic innovation, Bessel van der Kolk has been as influential as anyone in shaping the landscape of trauma therapy today. He describes what’s distinctive about the therapeutic potential of psychedelics.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Bill Doherty on Deepening Our Therapeutic Vision

The Importance of Cultivating a New Kind of Self

At the 2016 Psychotherapy Networker Symposium, Bill Doherty offered his take on how psychotherapy can reassert its cultural relevance by deepening its vision of what constitutes a meaningful life in today's world.

Daily Blog

Aging Courageously

…And What Many People Who Struggle with Aging Have in Common

By Joan Klagsbrun - As each of us grows older, we can try to embrace the full possibilities of aging, even alongside its challenges. In the following interview, Joan Klagsbrun, a leader in the field of Focusing-oriented therapy, explains what many people who struggle with aging have in common, and shares how a client spurred her own wake-up call about how to approach aging creatively.

Daily Blog

After the Affair

Two Case Studies Illustrate the Opportunities Moving Forward

By Don-David Lusterman - My goal is not merely to help these couples weather the crisis and patch things up, but to help them understand how both spouses created the marital context that made an affair possible, and how the crisis itself can be the spring board to a healthier, more satisfying relationship.

Daily Blog

The Perils of Empathy at Full Throttle

Four Strategies to Protect Yourself Against Vicarious Traumatization

By Babette Rothschild -  It's our gift for empathy that draws us to our work. And yet, empathy at full throttle—felt and projected 100 percent with our bodies, hearts, and minds—has its risks.

Daily Blog

The Unlived Lives of Parents

A Mindful Exercise for Healing Old Wounds

By Susan Pollak - Becoming a parent gives us a chance to grow by attending to old wounds, including many that we may have forgotten. The aim is not to deny our history, but to understand it and develop a new relationship with it, bringing self-compassion to ourselves in those moments when we lose it. Here's a seven-step process that can help.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Dan Siegel on the Difference Between the Mind and Brain

…And How Brain Science Can Help Us Create a Kinder World

According to neuropsychiatrist Dan Siegel, we've spent much of modern history thinking that physiological brain activity determines everything, and ignoring what goes on in the mind. In the following video clip from his Networker Symposium keynote, Siegel challenges us to help the mind rise above the brain's inborn, evolutionary vulnerabilities.

Daily Blog

Finding the Path Back

Couples Therapy After an Affair

By Leo Fay - Every therapist knows that the disclosure of an extramarital affair can create an explosive crisis undermining the foundation of trust necessary to sustain a relationship. In the midst of that turbulence, our job is to help couples find a pathway to a new understanding of themselves and their marriage. Here's a protocol I've found especially helpful.

Daily Blog

Getting Anxious on Purpose

This Approach Can Reduce Anxiety Symptoms in as Little as Three Weeks

By Reid Wilson - My clinical experience indicates that clients who can be persuaded to provoke and endure their symptoms without resorting to relaxation exercises quickly become habituated to their fears. Here's the five-step treatment I've developed, based on the work of the top clinicians and researchers in the anxiety field.

Daily Blog

Something's Missing from Family Therapy

Twenty-Five Years Later, a Poignant Message from the Late Betty Carter Still Resonates

By Betty Carter - In order to understand the particularity of almost any couple's personal experience, we need to adjust our lens to include not only their private domestic encounters, but the much larger political and social struggle about the politics of relationships beyond the walls of home.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Learning to Let Go of Trauma

Bessel van der Kolk on the Power of Creating a Narrative

Imagine the helplessness of being unable to distinguish painful past experiences from present ones. According to Bessel van der Kolk, author of The Body Keeps the Score, this is what happens when a traumatic memory is triggered. Old emotional responses bubble up even when the current trigger has little to do with the original trauma.

Daily Blog

August Quandary: How Do I Get Clients to Engage in Work Between Sessions?

Five Clinicians Weigh In

By Chris Lyford - A therapist recommends exercises like journaling prompts and guided mediations that she feels would benefit her clients between sessions. Although they seem interested when she introduces the idea, they always “forget” or can’t find the time to follow through. She's unsure how to proceed. Here, five therapists share what they'd do.

Daily Blog

The Mentor Who Changed My Therapy Practice

…And How Two Little Words Changed Everything

By Chris Lyford - While therapeutic skill is the product of years of practice and self-determination, most clinicians need a mentor: someone who takes them under their wing and inspires them to be a better therapist. The five clinicians whose stories you’re about to read all agree on one thing: seeing how their mentors practice left an indelible mark on their personal and professional development that still resonates today.

Daily Blog

Transforming Anger into Compassion

A Five-Step Process for Dealing with Angry Clients

By Steven Stosny - Some therapists find themselves getting extremely reactive when clients lose their temper. Here's what you can do to better control your anger and anxiety in the presence of an angry client.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: The Biggest Threat to Remarried Boomers

Helping Partners Deal with Stepfamilies

Successfully combining families as part of remarriage is always challenging. But it's especially hard when older re-couplers have adult children, who may or may not be onboard with the new marriage, and extended networks of decades-long relationships that need to be included in the picture.

Daily Blog

How I Came to Rethink Children’s Challenging Behaviors

Doing Away with the Blame Game

By Mona Delahooke - What’s at the root of children’s aggressive, defiant, and oppositional acts? And how can we better help the children who exhibit these behaviors? Polyvagal Theory shows that the drive to avoid threat and secure safety is what guides human behavior. As such, what we often label as “bad” behaviors are actually fight-or-flight behaviors.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Being a Therapist Isn't Always Easy

A Message from Zach Taylor, Director of Continuing Education

How can we help you become an even more effective therapist? As we grow, we never want to forget that this is about you and all the amazing people who practice psychotherapy.

Daily Blog

Treating Self-Harm

Here's a Behavioral Contract That Clients Can Follow

By Lisa Ferentz - I used to think that repetitive self-injury could only be seen as pathological, and through contracts and other means tried to convince my clients that this behavior would only cause more problems. Now, I know that my job isn't to browbeat clients into change, but introduce them to healthier behaviors that bring the relief cutting often provides.

Daily Blog

Can You Keep a Secret?

A Story of How One Therapist Changed Her Mind About Keeping Secrets

By Evan Imber-Black - Decades ago, a family walked into one therapist's office and utterly destroyed her beliefs about keeping secrets.

Daily Blog

Moving in Our Own Way

A Catatonic Client Teaches a Dance Therapist What It Means to Connect

By Jody Wager - I'm a dance and movement therapist. All my life, I’ve loved to move, to feel a sense of expansiveness and connection unfurl throughout my body. So imagine my surprise as a young intern when my supervisor assigned me to work with a man diagnosed with catatonia.

Daily Blog
Page 4 of 51 (1264 Items)