Blog Archives

Sort by:

The Free Therapy Movement of Give an Hour

Therapists Extend Their Reach to Veterans in Need

By Chris Lyford - Since its founding in 2005, the Give an Hour organization has created a nationwide network of nearly 7,000 social workers, psychotherapists, psychiatrists, couples therapists, and substance-abuse counselors who’ve committed one hour a week to doing free counseling with members of the military and their families.

Daily Blog

The Importance of Love, the Primal Refuge

An Openhearted Reflection from Rick Hanson's 2016 Symposium Address

In a moving closing address, Rick Hanson invoked the spirit of Mr. Rogers to help attendees better acknowledge their connection with each other and savor their most inspiring Symposium experiences at the meeting.

Daily Blog

The Power of the Emotional Brain

Using Brain Science to Spark Behavioral Change

By Brent Atkinson - Throughout history, we’ve been operating under a great deception—we tend to believe that our thoughts and actions result largely from our conscious intentions. In fact, while our rational mind has a degree of veto power, the inclinations that fuel our perceptions, interpretations, and actions primarily come from neural processes that operate beneath the level of awareness. The emotional brain plays a crucial role in the machinery of rationality: the brain generates quick, gut-level emotional reactions that collectively serve as a guidance system for reasoning.

Daily Blog

Promoting Positive Caregiving

Helping Clients Escape Negative Cycles in Caring for Aging Parents

By Barry Jacobs and Julia Mayer - The bedraggled, beleaguered, and bereft family caregivers who come to us for therapy have a common litany of complaints. They feel overburdened by caregiving tasks, unacknowledged by those they’re caring for, and unsupported by family members who take their herculean efforts for granted. Here's how to help them approach the caregiving experience more positively.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: New Networker Master Class Series! Overcoming Resistance with David Burns

The Secret to Better Outcomes in Less Time

According to David Burns, MD, one of the originators of CBT and an expert in treating depression and anxiety, too often therapists ignore clients’ aversion to change. So he's developed a powerful approach to overcoming client resistance — once and for all. In our new online Master Class, Overcoming Resistance with Dr. David Burns: The Secret to Better Outcomes in Less Time, you can learn how David applies his evidence-based TEAM approach to motivate clients toward change and increase positive outcomes.

Daily Blog

New Video Course! Overcoming Resistance with David Burns

The Secret to Better Outcomes in Less Time

By Rich Simon - There’s something both inspirational and humbling about watching master therapists at work. And while it's tempting to think of them as possessing rare therapeutic gifts, it's more helpful to ask, How exactly do they do it? Find out in our new Master Class Series.

Daily Blog

Protecting Your Therapy Clients in an Age of Technology

Ensuring Client Confidentiality by Being a Tech-Savvy Therapist

By Alli Spotts-De Lazzer - If you're a psychotherapist who uses any portable device to communicate with or about patients, it's vitally important to assess confidentiality risks and implement data security before a theft or loss occurs. Although no security is 100 percent foolproof, you can make reasonable and appropriate efforts to protect confidential data.

Daily Blog

Issues of Race and Therapy

Ken Hardy on the Need to Expand Our Therapeutic Focus

By Kenneth Hardy - As therapists, I’m hoping that you recognize that there’s a critical distinction to be made between our work and our job. It may well be that in your job, you don’t interface with people of color. But I hope it wouldn’t be true of your work, because our work is what we do on behalf of humanity. Our work is what we do to make sure that we leave this planet a little bit better, a little more advanced. So even if it isn’t your job, I hope you’d make talking about race your work.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Making the Case for the Emotional Man

Pat Love Explains Why We Need to Rethink the "Empathy Gap"

Have you ever wondered if some men in your practice are simply unable to listen, connect, and empathize with their partners? According to Pat Love, it’s more likely that our definition of empathy is just too narrow.

Daily Blog

10 Best-Ever Anxiety-Management Techniques

There are Effective Alternatives to Medication

By Margaret Wehrenberg - The sensations of doom or dread or panic felt by anxiety sufferers are truly overwhelming--the very same sensations, in fact, that a person would feel if the worst really were happening. Here are a few anxiety-management techniques that can offer relief, and offer it quickly.

Daily Blog

Introducing Mindfulness in Therapy

Helping Clients Bring Mindful Awareness to Anxious Thoughts and Sensations

By Shai Lavie - It sometimes seems as if there isn’t a psychotherapy seminar or workshop anywhere in the country that doesn’t have “mindfulness” in the title, yet most therapists these days are still vague about how they can use mindfulness techniques, minute-by-minute, in sessions, and how guiding clients through mindfulness exercises can help resolve difficult, long-standing issues. What follows is a brief primer on the specifics of incorporating mindfulness into therapeutic practice.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: When One Partner Wants Out

Discernment Counseling for the Mixed-Agenda Couple

In at least 30 percent of couples who come to therapy, partners enter the consulting room with different agendas---one wants a divorce, the other wants to save the marriage. Bill Doherty, cofounder of The Doherty Relationship Institute and director of the Minnesota Couples on the Brink Project, says the stakes are high in this scenario and traditional approaches fall short with these mixed-agenda couples.

Daily Blog

The Transgender Journey

What Role should therapists play?

By Jean Malpas - Many parents confront new definitions of gender as pioneers, some never having heard the word transgender or cisgender before, all of them hacking their way through a wilderness of confusion, panic, and shame. As we work together, they slowly begin to understand---and act on---what we’ve found to be three essential elements of healing.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Attuning to Reluctant Teens

Getting Through to Shut-Down Kids

Most therapists are aware of the perils of trying to connect with teenage clients. Teens are often brought to therapy against their will by adults, which can make them especially unwilling to let therapists in. And don’t talk to them like kids--they’re too old for that. But don’t bore them with stereotypical “therapist talk” either--they’re expecting that. So how do therapists relate to teens without seeming patronizing, clueless, or invasive? Therapist Dan Hughes explains...

Daily Blog

The Power of Community in Healing Trauma

Therapy in the Aftermath of the Paris Terrorist Attacks

By Chris Lyford - In the aftermath of terrorist attacks, such as the one in Paris, clinicians are increasingly aware that the most effective way of preventing or minimizing post-terror trauma isn’t some set of therapeutic techniques, but the power of community to help people feel connection and support.

Daily Blog

Practice at the Intersection of Psychotherapy and Coaching

Using Coaching Techniques to Encourage, Challenge, and Motivate Your Therapy Clients

By Lynn Grodzki - A new style of working has emerged that integrates the in-depth understanding of traditional therapy with the experience of being instructed, pushed, and challenged identified with coaching. But can a clinician effectively encompass both styles with the same client?

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Helping Trauma Survivors Find a New Normal

How to Help Clients Do More than Just Recover

There’s no question that helping clients return to a basic functional level should be the main goal with trauma survivors. But what if clients could not only eliminate traumatic stress, but also come away from treatment feeling more resilient and with a fuller sense of self? Lisa Ferentz explains her concept of Post-Traumatic Growth.

Daily Blog

The Negative Habits That Create Unhappiness

A Guide to the Self-Saboteur and Why They Behave the Way They Do

By Cloe Madanes - Most of us claim we want to be happy—to have meaningful lives, enjoy ourselves, experience fulfillment, and share love and friendship with other people. Strangely enough, however, some people act as if they just want to be miserable, and they succeed remarkably at inviting misery into their lives, even though they get little apparent benefit from it. So if you aspire to make yourself miserable, what are the best, most proven techniques for doing it?

Daily Blog

Creating Therapeutic Changes That Last

Why Changing Clients' Habits is Key to Making Therapy Stick

By Steven Stosny - With the exception of saints and literary characters, enduring change rarely happens as the result of being knocked off our feet by a spiritual or psychological whack upside the head. Perdurable change is gradual and mundane. It occurs by extending, supplementing, and altering the habits that shape perspectives and drive behavior. First comes the hard work; then comes the epiphany.

Daily Blog

How Therapy Reached the New Age of Trauma Treatment

Janina Fisher on Helping Trauma Clients Access Their Bodies, Resources, and Resilience

By Janina Fisher - In this new age of trauma treatment, we aim to help our clients find the light---or at least to find their bodies, their resources, and their resilience. Of course, listening to and witnessing the clients’ experiences remain central to the treatment process, but we now focus on much more than the traumatic events in their histories, knowing these events don’t define who they truly are.

Daily Blog

The Remarriage Triangle

Working with Later-Life Recouplers and their Grown Children

By Patricia Papernow -  Later-life recoupled families are appearing more and more often in therapists’ offices. Although divorce rates have dwindled in the United States over the last two decades, they’re soaring among people over 50, along with rates of remarriage. However, these later-life recouplers face many of the same challenges that younger stepfamilies do, complicated by the long-standing networks of relationships that come with this life stage.

Daily Blog

Strengthening Trauma Therapy by Bringing in the Family

Mary Jo Barrett on the Healing Potential of Families in Trauma Treatment

By Mary Jo Barrett - Mostly, I think we avoid family therapy because families can be so exhausting, creating an atmosphere of great emotional volatility, which requires us to be on our toes all the time. But the therapy experience takes on an entirely different dimension when family members learn to be healing agents for each other. Clients, especially those who’ve been traumatized, often feel disconnected from themselves and somehow separate and cut off from other people.

Daily Blog

Righting Psychotherapy's Reputation in the Media

Bessel van der Kolk and the New York Times

By Kathleen Smith - It’s no secret that psychotherapy has had an image problem in the media. Real and fictional clinicians on TV and in the movies are regularly portrayed as jargon-spouting caricatures, or are often shown to break ethical codes without blinking, displaying more personal problems than their clients. But a bigger part of the problem may be that, on the whole, therapists haven’t done a particularly good job explaining what we do or how it works.

Daily Blog

A Therapist Struggles with the Clinical Choices He's Made

Reflections on a Marriage Therapy with a Transitioning Spouse

By David Treadway - Sometimes I’ve been instrumental in helping couples stay married when perhaps they’d have been happier if they’d gotten divorced. Other times, it’s been the reverse. Obviously, we all know that’s it not our job to tell our clients what’s right for them: rather, we need to create the right conditions for them to discover the answers for themselves. Frequently, however, our own reactivity shapes the messages we send and how profoundly we can influence---in unconscious and unpredictable ways---the unfolding of some couples’ lives. I feel that way about my work with Glen and Julie over a 14-year span.

Daily Blog

VIDEO: Using Yoga to Calm the Revved-Up Client

The Yoga Breath’s Universal Application

Brain science has revealed how deep breathing can calm our overactive nervous system, clear our distressed mind, and restore us to a balanced emotional state, says Amy Weintraub, a recognized leader in the practice of yoga and a presenter at this year’s Psychotherapy Networker Symposium
So how do you introduce these techniques in session to an anxious client who may be averse to the idea of yoga? Hear Amy explain. . .

Daily Blog
Page 30 of 54 (1331 Items)