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Undoing “Learned Helplessness” In Depression

Elisha Goldstein on the Importance of Setting Aside What You Know as a Therapist to Ask Clients What They Need.


What do you need?

It’s a simple question, but not for someone who’s depressed. That’s why asking, with genuine curiosity, can be the beginning of a healing process for clients whose depression is fed by the sense that everything happens to them and that they have absolutely no control.In this video clip, mindfulness specialist, Elisha Goldstein, explains how asking this simple question begins a nurturing, strengthening process, that leads eventually to the client’s sense of having control—”I know what I need. I can take care of myself.

Join us for a full 1-hour session with Elisha this coming Wednesday, February 19th at 1 pm Eastern as part of our new webcast series on new depression treatment tools and techniques that really work:

Treating The Depressed Client:
The Most Effective Approaches

Click here for full course details

Here’s a preview of what each session in this series covers:

  • David Burns on Overcoming Resistance in Depression Treatment
    Develop a more powerful and effective approach to shortening depression treatment.
  • Michael Yapko on Depression: An Experiential Approach
    View video clips of a clinical interview and expand your range of active, skill-building techniques with depressed clients.
  • Zindel Segal on The Mindful Way Through Depression
    Bring the insights of mindfulness traditions into your work with depressed clients.
  • Margaret Wehrenberg on When Depression and Anxiety Co-Occur
    Identify seven types of anxious/depressed clients and how to approach each one.
  • Judith Beck on The Cognitive Therapy of Depression
    Learn powerful techniques for bringing about enduring changes in depression symptoms.
  • Elisha Goldstein on Self-Compassion and the Depressed Client
    Enhance your ability to create an atmosphere of trust and empowerment in working with depressed clients.

Don’t miss Elisha’s session—Self-Compassion and the Depressed Client—this Wednesday. You can watch previous sessions in this series on-demand and take up to a full year from your time of purchase to watch them all. Click here now for details.

Posted in Networker Exchange, Video Highlights | Tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Undoing “Learned Helplessness” In Depression

  1. Elliot Fisch says:

    I’ve never before heard someone take one minute and 41 seconds to suggest asking a client what they think they need to solve their problem. Extremely verbose for a reasonable suggestion. Paid by the minute?

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