Topic - Professional Development

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We've gathered Psychotherapy Networkers most popular posts and arranged them here by topic.

The Rise of Distance Therapy

What Does New Technology Mean for the Future of Therapy?

Kathleen Smith

By Kathleen Smith. We no longer live in a world in which we can so clearly partition ourselves off from the electronic information grid. Many occupations no longer require a clearly defined workplace or a physical presence. Why should psychotherapy be any different?

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New Choices for New Times

Giving Our Field a Boost

William Doherty

By William Doherty - Lately, psychotherapy seems to be suffering the same fate as many other professions that have declined in their cultural support and public clout. A big part of our problem is that our clinical models have assumed a level of universal truth about human functioning that transcends culture and history, but when the culture changes, then the model becomes outdated. What to do? Here’s a road map to a future of relevance.

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How to Improve Your Therapy Using Play and Emotion

Why Good Therapy Means Tapping Into the Client's Emotional Brain

Courtney Armstrong

How many times have you surprised yourself by jumping at the scary part of a movie? You know the villain in the movie isn’t real, but your emotional brain ignores this logic and leaps into action. In essence, the emotional brain is our unconscious mind, and scientists estimate that it controls about 95 percent of what we do, think, and feel at any given moment. As therapists, we have to be a provocative guide, creating experiences that go beyond the intellect to reach a deeply human place, prompting clients to believe they can relate to themselves and the world in a new way.

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Using Therapy Skills to Make Business More Insightful and Humane

A Therapist-Turned-Executive Coach on How to Repair Toxic Work Environments

Rob Pasick

For most of my life, the world of business seemed off-limits to me. But eventually, I began to think about how I might work with corporations and business leaders to make work settings more humane and bring more balance to the lives of the decision-makers who shaped the work environments in which most people earned their livings. Eventually, I decided to switch my focus from doing individual and family therapy to consulting to business leaders on how to be more self-aware and compassionate. Here's what I found out in the process.

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Is "Resistance" in the Therapy Room Really Dead?

Using Resistance as a Chance to Improve Your Therapy Skills

Clifton Mitchell

By Clifton Mitchell - With all the recent developments in research, theory, and practice, we have more treatment options to choose from than ever before. Why then do so many practitioners still find client “resistance” a regular companion in their consulting rooms? After many years, I’ve learned that rather than seeing our clients’ frustrating reactions as obstacles that we need to overcome, we can use them as valuable information with which to steer the therapeutic conversation more skillfully.

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Therapy Lessons from Men's Relationship with Sports

Using Athletics to Tap into Male Emotions, Relationships, and Aggression

Barry Jacobs

I understand and relate to the passion that many men have for sports. At the same time, I'm aware of a counternarrative held by many of my psychotherapist colleagues: sports breeds competition, which causes decreased empathy, which foments injustice. Still, there's so much more here: rich drama, with which to understand the strivings, insecurities, and identities of many of our male clients. Sports can teach us about trust, relationships, teamwork, and our power to regulate feelings.

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Using Internal Family Systems to Reduce Self-Criticism

Dick Schwartz Offers an IFS Approach to Self-Compassion

Richard Schwartz

When you think of yourself as being psychosocially monolithic, instead of comprising a range of different parts, having self-compassion seems simple: you just relate to the self you happen to identify with at the moment with warmth, rather than harshness. But once you recognize that you’ve got many selves in there, things become more complicated, and it becomes crucial to recognize that there are levels of self-compassion, some of which need much more effort, awareness, and emotional resilience than others.

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A Guide for Female Clinicians Treating Men in Therapy

Bridging the Gender Gap in the Consulting Room

Holly Sweet

When I started my clinical training, I wondered about the impact of men's discomfort with emotional expression (and women's ignorance of this discomfort) on how male clients experienced therapy with female therapists. From many years of attention to men's language, attitudes, and needs, I've developed a specific approach to working with male clients. For female clinicians, one of the side benefits of working with men is that it can help us understand the other men in our own lives. Both genders win when we learn more about men.

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The Healing Combination of Therapy and Disaster Relief

How an Uncommon Blend of Therapy and Volunteerism is Changing the World

Chris Lyford

Fifteen years ago, psychotherapist Jeffrey Kottler never imagined he’d be stuffing nine duffel bags full of antibiotics and suture kits for a return trip to Nepal. But since founding Empower Nepali Girls (ENG) to provide scholarships to at-risk children, he's returned to the country several times each year with a small team to rescue girls from probable futures in sex slavery, putting them on the path to careers in medicine, engineering, and teaching. And Kottler isn't alone in his relief efforts. In fact, many therapists are redefining what it means to create a connection, the resulting product being an uncommon blend of therapy, relief work, and social justice advocacy. Here are a few of their stories.

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VIDEO: Why Clients Will Pay More For An Intensive Session

Casey Truffo On Structuring A Therapeutic Intensive

Casey Truffo

With some clients, issues, or circumstances, an hour is not quite enough time to dig in. That’s why it’s great to have an “Intensive Option.” Think of the “Intensive Option” as a 3-hour mini-retreat providing focused attention on issues your clients are highly motivated to resolve. It's the kind of experience clients increasingly want

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