Topic - Mindfulness

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We've gathered Psychotherapy Networkers most popular posts and arranged them here by topic.

How to Improve Your Therapy Using Play and Emotion

Why Good Therapy Means Tapping Into the Client's Emotional Brain

Courtney Armstrong

How many times have you surprised yourself by jumping at the scary part of a movie? You know the villain in the movie isn’t real, but your emotional brain ignores this logic and leaps into action. In essence, the emotional brain is our unconscious mind, and scientists estimate that it controls about 95 percent of what we do, think, and feel at any given moment. As therapists, we have to be a provocative guide, creating experiences that go beyond the intellect to reach a deeply human place, prompting clients to believe they can relate to themselves and the world in a new way.

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VIDEO: Inspiration for the Season from Tara Brach

Deliberate Practice and Inner Transformation

Tara Brach

Being compassionate and trusting is fundamental to our nature. But according to noted mindfulness teacher Tara Brach, it can be hard to stay true to our highest selves in a world that’s fragmented and fragmenting. In this address from the 2013 Symposium, she shares a moving personal example of how deliberate practice leads to inner transformation.

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Rediscovering the Therapeutic Sanctuary of the Wilderness

How a Wilderness Pilgrimage Helped One Man Reclaim Mindfulness and Connection

Dick Anderson

Standing in my bedroom one evening more than a dozen years ago, I made an announcement to my wife: "I've got to go to the wilderness. Alone. It's been something I've been carrying in the back of my mind most of my life, and if I don't do it now, while I'm still able, I'll never do it." So a dozen years ago, I began making an annual two- to three-week pilgrimage into the wilderness to reacquaint myself with the rivers, mountains, and lands that we share with fellow creatures, and---in this vast expanse of silence---to do something I don't normally do in my busy life: just stop and listen.

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Healing Early Attachment Injuries by Listening to Our Trauma

Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy to Speak with Shameful Inner Parts

Janina Fisher

As therapists, we often encounter clients who are so mired in self-hatred that our best efforts to support a sense of self-worth only seem to dig the hole of judgment and self-loathing deeper. Eventually, I began to wonder if the resulting clinical quagmire might be a reflection of a kind of "internal attachment disorder" mirroring the emotional injuries of early childhood. Was it possible that alienation from self and others had become an essential survival strategy early in life? Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, I guide my clients in "befriending" the parts they unconsciously disown.

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VIDEO: Moving Forward When Treatment Seems to Make a Problem Worse

Chris Germer on shifting the focus from fixing a problem to embracing it with compassion

Christopher Germer

What someone resists persists. It’s a paradoxical dynamic that you’ve probably seen in the course of your own clinical work. In this video, Chris explains how “fixing” approaches can backfire and then he shares an example from his own life of self-compassion’s ability to soften resistance and heal a deep, persistent issue.

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VIDEO: Overcoming Barriers to Self-Compassion

Tim Desmond on Self-Compassion in Therapy

Tim Desmond

For many clients who come into therapy with low self-esteem, shame, or self-blame, the practice of self-compassion is the missing piece in the therapeutic puzzle. But it’s not that straightforward for all clients. To learn more about the barriers to self-compassion and how to overcome them, we turned to Tim Desmond, clinical psychologist and author of Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy.

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Going Beyond Mindfulness with Internal Family Systems

Dick Schwartz on Achieving Awareness and Healing with IFS Therapy

Richard Schwartz

A perennial quandary in psychotherapy, as well as spirituality, is whether the goal is to help people come to accept the inevitable pain of the human condition with more equanimity or to actually transform and heal the pain, shame, or terror, so that it’s no longer a problem. The goal of the therapeutic approach that I use, Internal Family Systems (IFS), is to build on the important first step of separating from and accepting self-destructive impulses, and then take a second step of helping clients transform them.

 

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Expanding Your Therapeutic Presence with Self-Compassion

Moving Beyond Mindfulness by Embracing Our Suffering

Christopher Germer

With the rapid proliferation of new therapies for every possible difficulty in life, it often seems that we’re trying to do the impossible---eliminate basic human suffering. But suffering doesn’t seem to go away, no matter how many therapies or self-help strategies we employ. When we’re overwhelmed with intense and disturbing emotions, such as shame, just noticing what’s happening is often not enough. We need to embrace ourselves. Self-compassion allows us to do this. It means treating ourselves with the same kindness and understanding with which we’d want to treat someone we truly love.

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VIDEO: Treating Anxiety

David Burns on the Paradox of Resistance

David Burns

According to therapist and author David Burns, the biggest barrier to treating anxiety successfully is recognizing how clients covertly hold onto their symptoms, even when it causes them distress. Here, Burns explains how he addresses resistance to create meaningful and lasting change.

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VIDEO: Depression Is Not a Disease, It’s a Wake-Up Call

James Gordon on Healing without Antidepressants

James Gordon

Depression is not a disease, so the promise of antidepressants as a cure just doesn’t hold water. That’s the assessment of James Gordon, M.D. and he should know. Jim is the author of Unstuck: Your Guide to the Seven Stage Journey out of Depression.

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