Topic - Couples

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We've gathered Psychotherapy Networkers most popular posts and arranged them here by topic.

Head-to-Head with Emotion

Susan Johnson on Why Labeling Clients’ Emotions Isn’t Enough

Rich Simon

Emotions can be tricky—once they enter the consulting room, it’s easy for both therapists and clients to become stuck in, overwhelmed by, and embattled with strong emotions.

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The Trouble with Trying to Heal Trauma Too Fast

Rich Simon

Sometimes moving clients right into re-experiencing a traumatic event for cathartic effect works and clients feel some relief in the therapy hour. But according to Internal Family Systems developer Dick Schwartz, this type of therapy has costs.

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Taking Off The Gloves

David Schnarch On How Confrontation Speeds Up Couples Therapy

Rich Simon

Couples therapist, David Schnarch, is not interested in having a couple feel secure in the consulting room.

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Finding the Missing Link to Chronic Pain

Maggie Phillips On The Levels Of Unreleased Trauma

Rich Simon

Pain is usually associated with a currently existing physical injury, which makes helping clients who suffer from chronic pain especially challenging.

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Becoming a Part of the Child Client’s Story

Dan Hughes on the Effectiveness of Psychological Hand-Holding

Rich Simon

Daniel Hughes has many techniques to suggest when working with troubled children who have put up a wall.

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How Attachment Issues Undermine True Intimacy

Sue Johnson On Identifying And Healing The Wounds Of Attachment

Rich Simon

Attachment theory has profoundly altered our understanding of how early childhood injuries negatively affect clients throughout their lives. But the theory offers little guidance on how to recognize and address attachment issues underlying other problems.

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At the Heart of Intimacy

Psychotherapy Networker

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From Research to Practice: Scoreboard for Couples Therapies

Which are the Winners in the Latest Research?

Jay Lebow

Couples therapy is on a roll. Whereas a mere 20 years ago, surveys showed that consumers didn't think much of it, today it's become increasingly accepted by the general public. Yet the research about couples therapy, as well as research about couples themselves--why some marriages succeed and others don't--hasn't kept pace with the growth of couples therapy.

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