Topic - Brain Science & Psychotherapy

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We've gathered Psychotherapy Networkers most popular posts and arranged them here by topic.

VIDEO: Dan Siegel Explains Why Brain Integration is the Key to Good Mental Health

Here's What a Healthy Mind Looks Like

Dan Siegel • 2/15/2017 • No Comments

According to Dan Siegel, understanding the connection between the brain and the miraculously various operations of the human mind and body is the first step in applying the findings of brain science in clinical practice. In the following video clip, he explains why integration is the critical brain function for supporting that healing connection.

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Neuroscience and Psychotherapy

Dan Siegel on the Craft of Rewiring the Brain

Dan Siegel • 2/3/2017 • 1 Comment

By Daniel Siegel - The past 40 years have given us a view of the mind that encompasses an emergent, self-organizing, embodied, and relational process that regulates the flow of energy and information. We now know that where attention goes, neural firing flows, and neural connection grows. Helping people develop more neural integration goes beyond reducing symptoms: it helps them thrive.

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VIDEO: Stephen Porges on How Trauma Affects Our Ability to Connect

The Science Behind Healthy Relationships

Stephen Porges • 12/28/2016 • 1 Comment

Stress responses aren't only vested within the sympathetic nervous system’s capacity to support fight-or-flight behaviors. There’s another defense system that’s mediated through a vagal circuit, says Stephen Porges, creator of the Polyvagal Theory. In the following video from his 2016 Networker Symposium keynote address, he explains how the vagus nerve is affected by trauma, and what this means for our ability to build meaningful relationships.

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VIDEO: Rick Hanson on Using Brain Science to Build Inner Strengths

Cultivating Positive Emotions, Attitudes, and Virtues in Ourselves and Others

Rick Hanson • 9/5/2016 • No Comments

Weaving together insights from evolutionary biology, modern neuroscience, positive psychology, and mindfulness practices, neuropsychologist Rick Hanson claims the difficulty at the core of human experience is our perpetual struggle to overcome the negativity bias wired into our brains. In the following clip from his Symposium Keynote, he explains how understanding the brain can help therapists and their clients grow inner strengths.

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VIDEO: Dan Siegel on the Therapist's Mission in the Modern Age

Attending to How We Relate to Each Other and the Planet

Dan Siegel • 8/22/2016 • No Comments

In this video clip from his 2015 Networker Symposium Keynote address, "Healing and Hope in the Human Age," psychiatrist and bestselling author Dan Siegel explores how human consciousness can evolve to meet the unprecedented challenges we face on a planet we're altering in ways never before contemplated.

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VIDEO: Barbara Fredrickson on the Science of Love

Learning to Think About Love in a New Way

Barbara Fredrickson • 8/15/2016 • 1 Comment

According to Barbara Fredrickson, a leading scholar in the field of social psychology and affective science, we have a tendency to think about love in abstract terms. In this clip from her Networker Symposium keynote, she makes the case for broadening our perspective of what love means on both a physical and emotional level.

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Are Therapists Overly Enamored with Brain Science?

Why the Essence of Brain Change Begins with Building Inner Strengths

Rick Hanson • 8/2/2016 • No Comments

By Rick Hanson - It’s perfectly natural to be enthralled by the explosive growth of neuroscience research and how it's offering evidence for the effectiveness of different therapeutic methods. But people come to therapists because they want something to change: they want to feel or act differently or understand themselves or others better. These changes of mind, of course, require changes of brain. But in many ways, the essence of therapy is developing inner strengths.

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VIDEO: Stephen Porges on the Building Blocks of Healthy Relationships

What Co-regulation Actually Looks Like

Stephen Porges • 7/25/2016 • 5 Comments

In developing the Polyvagal Theory, psychophysiologist Stephen Porges, transformed the way therapists understand of the underlying mechanisms of traumatic response and how safety, caring, and trustworthiness is conveyed unconsciously in our body language, voice tonality, facial expression, and eye contact. In this video clip, he explains what healthy co-regulation looks like in the body.

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Therapy's Nonverbal Dance

Learning Nonverbal Cues to Strengthen the Therapeutic Relationship

Steve Andreas • 7/19/2016 • No Comments

By Steve Andreas - Getting immediate, nonverbal feedback from clients is essential to knowing how they’re responding in a session, and in maintaining the therapeutic relationship, which research shows is essential for successful therapy. Here are some strategies to increase your sensitivity to nonverbal shifts.

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The Power of Memory Reconsolidation

Unlocking Emotional Learning for Transformational Change

Bruce Ecker • 7/5/2016 • 2 Comments

By Bruce Ecker, Robin Ticic, and Laurel Hilley - While most neuroscientists once believed that implicit memories, avoidance reactions, and rigid schemas were locked permanently in the brain’s synaptic pathways, recent brain research shows that, under certain conditions and within a brief timeframe, we can not only unlock these neural pathways, but actually erase them and substitute new learning.

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