When therapists work with anxious kids and their families, they’re often solving immediate problems, not envisioning a clinical relationship that could last for decades. But that’s what happened for brief therapist Lynn Lyons. Here, she talks about the unexpected pleasures of being there for her youngest clients as they grow into teens and young adults.

"Therapy ends for all sorts of reasons. Plenty of families see me briefly," Lynn says in her recent Networker article, "But it seems that these young clients making the transition toward adulthood may be in more need than ever for ongoing connection and an open invitation to return as needed. As I witness these young adults move into the world, this type of connection and continuity feels more vital than ever."

Lynn Lyons

Lynn Lyons, LICSW, is a speaker, trainer, and practicing clinician specializing in the treatment of anxious families. She’s the coauthor of Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents and Playing with Anxiety: Casey’s Guide for Teens and Kids and cohost of the podcast Flusterclux.  

Lauren Dockett

Lauren Dockett, MS, is Psychotherapy Networker’s senior writer. A longtime journalist, journalism lecturer, and book and magazine editor, she’s also a former caseworker taken with the complexity of mental health, who finds the ongoing evolution of the therapy field and its broadening reach an engrossing story.  Prior to the Networker, she contributed to many outlets, including The Washington Post, NPR, and Salon. Her books include Facing 30, Sex Talk, and The Deepest Blue.  Visit her website at laurendockett.com.

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Interviews & Profiles Anxiety & Depression Families Kids & Teens
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Continuing to See Kids for Therapy as They Age