How Psychotherapy Lost Its Magick

The Art of Healing in an Age of Science

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble • 3/13/2017

Studies show more people pay for the services of advisors claiming special powers than see mental health practitioners. How can mentalists and mediums be flourishing at a time when therapists—trained and sanctioned to care for people’s emotional well-being—are struggling to inspire confidence? In an effort to improve therapists’ efficacy, two researchers find themselves on an unexpected path.

Magazine Article

Scott Miller on Resolving Our Identity Crisis

Scott Miller • 3/1/2015

To move forward, our profession needs a more consistent message about what we have to offer.

Magazine Article

Antidepressants and Therapy, a Strange Alliance

With Psychopharmacology So Popular, Do We Still Need Therapy?

Scott Miller • 2/10/2015

In the last decade, a vast intellectual and emotional sea change has taken place. We now inhabit a culture where many people hold the view that their emotional pain is "biochemical" and can be cured by simply taking a pill. In this prevailing cultural script, therapy is sometimes ignored altogether. These views have taken on the luster of scientific truths. But they are not truths. They are myths. Our culture's exaggerated faith in these psychiatric medications rests not on science, but on brilliant marketing by a profit-driven industry. Outcome research has not found these drugs to be any better than therapy, and only marginally better than placebos.

Daily Blog
Copyright:
1/31/2013
Authors:
SCOTT MILLER, PHD
 
BARRY DUNCAN, PSY.D.
 
DON MEICHENBAUM, PH.D.
 
ETIENNE WENGER, PHD
 
MICHAEL LAMBERT, PHD
 
WILLIAM PINSOF, PHD, LMFT, ABPP
 
ROBBIE BABINS-WAGNER, PHD, MSW
Product:
NOS095508
Copyright:
1/8/2013
Author:
SCOTT MILLER, PHD
Product:
NOS095529

Supershrinks

What's the Secret of Their Success?

Mark Hubble, Scott Miller • 11/1/2007

Why do some therapists clearly stand out above the rest, consistently getting far better results than most of their colleagues? According to the research, it isn't training, experience, theory, personality style, or even raw talent that makes the difference.

Magazine Article

How Being Bad Can Make You Better

Developing a Culture of Feedback in Your Practice

Barry Duncan, Scott Miller • 11/1/2007

Regularly using a few simple feedback measures—plus paying close attention to your failures—can make you a better therapist.

Magazine Article

Exposing the Mythmakers

How Soft Sell Has Replaced Hard Science

Barry Duncan, Scott Miller • 3/2/2000

Emotional suffering, according to a new view, is a genetic glitch, successfully treatable by drugs. Depression is no longer thought to be shaped by such diverse forces as a sedentary, lonely or impoverished life;

the loss of love, health or community; "learned helplessness" or feelings of powerlessness arising from unsatisfying work or an abusive relationship. Its resolution no longer requires anyone to get meaningful support from others, to establish a collaborative relationship with a good psychotherapist, to draw on community resources, or for communities to address conditions that breed depression.


Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (8 Items)
Copyright:
1/31/2013
Authors:
SCOTT MILLER, PHD
 
BARRY DUNCAN, PSY.D.
 
DON MEICHENBAUM, PH.D.
 
ETIENNE WENGER, PHD
 
MICHAEL LAMBERT, PHD
 
WILLIAM PINSOF, PHD, LMFT, ABPP
 
ROBBIE BABINS-WAGNER, PHD, MSW
Product:
NOS095508
Copyright:
1/8/2013
Author:
SCOTT MILLER, PHD
Product:
NOS095529
Page 1 of 1 (2 Items)

Antidepressants and Therapy, a Strange Alliance

With Psychopharmacology So Popular, Do We Still Need Therapy?

Scott Miller • 2/10/2015

In the last decade, a vast intellectual and emotional sea change has taken place. We now inhabit a culture where many people hold the view that their emotional pain is "biochemical" and can be cured by simply taking a pill. In this prevailing cultural script, therapy is sometimes ignored altogether. These views have taken on the luster of scientific truths. But they are not truths. They are myths. Our culture's exaggerated faith in these psychiatric medications rests not on science, but on brilliant marketing by a profit-driven industry. Outcome research has not found these drugs to be any better than therapy, and only marginally better than placebos.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1

How Psychotherapy Lost Its Magick

The Art of Healing in an Age of Science

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble • 3/13/2017

Studies show more people pay for the services of advisors claiming special powers than see mental health practitioners. How can mentalists and mediums be flourishing at a time when therapists—trained and sanctioned to care for people’s emotional well-being—are struggling to inspire confidence? In an effort to improve therapists’ efficacy, two researchers find themselves on an unexpected path.

Magazine Article

Scott Miller on Resolving Our Identity Crisis

Scott Miller • 3/1/2015

To move forward, our profession needs a more consistent message about what we have to offer.

Magazine Article

Supershrinks

What's the Secret of Their Success?

Mark Hubble, Scott Miller • 11/1/2007

Why do some therapists clearly stand out above the rest, consistently getting far better results than most of their colleagues? According to the research, it isn't training, experience, theory, personality style, or even raw talent that makes the difference.

Magazine Article

How Being Bad Can Make You Better

Developing a Culture of Feedback in Your Practice

Barry Duncan, Scott Miller • 11/1/2007

Regularly using a few simple feedback measures—plus paying close attention to your failures—can make you a better therapist.

Magazine Article

Exposing the Mythmakers

How Soft Sell Has Replaced Hard Science

Barry Duncan, Scott Miller • 3/2/2000

Emotional suffering, according to a new view, is a genetic glitch, successfully treatable by drugs. Depression is no longer thought to be shaped by such diverse forces as a sedentary, lonely or impoverished life;

the loss of love, health or community; "learned helplessness" or feelings of powerlessness arising from unsatisfying work or an abusive relationship. Its resolution no longer requires anyone to get meaningful support from others, to establish a collaborative relationship with a good psychotherapist, to draw on community resources, or for communities to address conditions that breed depression.


Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (5 Items)
Scott Miller, Ph.D., founder of the International Center for Clinical Excellence, is the coauthor of The Heart and Soul of Change: What Works in Therapy and The Heroic Client: Principles of Client-Directed, Outcome-Informed Clinical Work.