Editors Note


Editors Note

By Rich Simon

May/June 2008



In "The Immigrant's Odyssey," therapist Priska Imberti, herself an immigrant, writes movingly about the need to understand the balance between helping immigrant clients mourn their losses and celebrate their successes—a balance that's necessary for them to recover from the traumatic aspects of their displacement and relocation. But this issue doesn't present new treatment models, therapeutic answers, or easily learned strategies for becoming a multicultural specialist. Instead it poses the larger question of how psychotherapy might illuminate the transnational, transcultural currents that increasingly underlie conflicts in the U.S. and around the world.

We need to begin to consider how we can transform our way of thinking about people and their problems to incorporate the messiness, intensity, ferocity, and glorious potential of what we might now call the Era of the Immigrant, in which "minorities," taken together, may soon be majorities in every developed country on earth. As Ventura reminds us, the current task of psychology is "to begin to understand not only what new social mind is being created before our eyes, but what new social mind is emerging in our own heads."

Page 2 of 2


Previous: Family Matters

Read 6941 times
Comments - (existing users please login first)
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*
*