Topic - Anxiety/Depression

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We've gathered Psychotherapy Networkers most popular posts and arranged them here by topic.

Tools for Managing Effective Couples Therapy

Bringing Struggling Couples Out of Their Comfort Zones

Ellyn Bader and Peter Pearson

If we now recognize how inescapably relational and interconnected people are, why do most of us continue to work primarily with individuals---most of whom grapple with serious, persistent problems in their intimate relationships? Part of the reason, of course, is that so many clients themselves avoid couples therapy. Sometimes they resist because they aren't motivated, or because they fear the unpleasant things their partners might say about them. Being an effective couples therapist requires us to develop skills we may not come by naturally and to spend a lot of time feeling unsure of our capabilities.

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The Internal Family Systems Approach to Psychopharmacology

Frank Anderson on Using IFS to Explore Clients' Feelings About Medication

Frank Anderson

As both a prescriber and a therapist, I believe that the chemical effect of pills is only part of their impact. The other part may seem a little weird, I warn clients, but it has to do with their thoughts, feelings, and expectations around the medications they take—in other words, their relationship with their drugs. I emphasize that for some people, more may be riding on this relationship, the source of so much hope and potential disappointment, than on any other in their life.

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Therapy Confronts the DSM-5

Therapists React to the Latest Diagnostic and Statistical Manual

Martha Teater

Since few people argue that mental health professionals can treat people or do research without some sort of diagnostic system, we’ll have to make friends with latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. But how are ordinary clinicians across the country adapting to its specifics? As someone who’s given dozens of workshops on DSM-5 and trained thousands of therapists in its use, I’ve had a front-row seat on how psychotherapists have reacted to the changes it means for their practice.

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Psychotherapy Enters the Assisted Suicide Debate

Untangling the Controversy Behind the Right-to-Die Movement

Jordan Magaziner, Jordan Magaziner

At a time when medical technology has become increasingly adept at keeping people alive, some people are voicing a feeling within a growing part of the population that the goal may not always be keeping a terminally ill person alive at all costs. But even though there's support for the idea that, under certain circumstances, it might be more humane to help people at the end of life bring about their own death peacefully and quickly, the right-to-die effort is plagued with controversy.

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Creative Therapy with the Humor Antidote

Using Playfulness to Move Stuck Clients Into Recovery

Cloe Madanes

When clients are deeply stuck, they have lost all sense of perspective, all capacity to see any possible humor or lightness in their problem or in their lives. Emotionally and cognitively, they’re trapped in their own sad story. In these cases, the approach that I’ve found most useful is a kind of soft shock therapy in the form of a humorous paradoxical directive. Playful, humorous strategies can be like therapeutic life preservers, which keep both therapist and client afloat until both can get back to shore. Humor reboots the emotions and enables us to look at our situation with fresh eyes.

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Getting to the Hidden Cause of Anxiety

David Burns on the Origin of His Hidden Emotion Technique

David Burns

When I first began my career in CBT, it seemed to work a lot better than medications and talk therapy, and clients liked it. Sometimes, the results were fast and spectacular. But something was missing. It seemed obvious that negative thoughts triggered anxiety, but what caused the negative thoughts? What was it inside a person that made him or her so vulnerable to intense anxiety and insecurity? Then one day, one of my patients got me to thinking about anxiety in an entirely new way.

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The Healing Potential of Childhood Memories

The Power of Guided Meditation in the Therapy Room

Rhegina Sinozich

Helping clients directly taste the kind of spontaneity, freedom, and untethered happiness that’s often left behind in early childhood, while not in itself offering an instant cure, can become a powerful beacon illuminating the path toward healing. As a result, I've developed ways of helping clients access intense memories of positive childhood experiences that can jump-start the therapy process.

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How to Prepare for Insurance Company Treatment Reviews

Tips for Proving Your Therapy is Medically Necessary

Barbara Griswold

While treatment review has always been a part of insurance reimbursement, therapists in the last few years have reported an increase in such phone calls from insurance companies. But what’s the health plan looking for when reviewing for medical necessity? What does the language of medical necessity sound like, and how can you learn to speak it fluently? Here are a few tips.

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Using Play in Therapy to Solve Emotional Problems

Why Creative Strategies are the Therapist's Best Tool

Courtney Armstrong

How many times have you surprised yourself by jumping at the scary part of a movie? It isn’t enough to be a kind, supportive guide on clients’ journeys. We have to be a provocative guide, creating experiences that trigger their curiosity and desire to know more. Human behavior and motivation are driven mostly by the emotional brain---the brain centers that mediate “primitive” emotions and instincts and respond to sensory-rich experiences, not intellectual insights.

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The Many Reasons Why Therapy Clients Cry

A Clinician's Guide to the Biological Basis of Tears

Jay Efran and Mitchell Green

How can both joyful and tragic events elicit tears? This question puzzles many clinicians, including some who are considered experts in the field of emotional expression. The problem is that few of us have received explicit training in theories of emotion. Physiologically speaking, emotional tears are elicited when a person’s system shifts rapidly from sympathetic to parasympathetic activity---from a state of high tension to a period of recalibration and recovery. And sometimes, clinicians can feel an urge to rush in and “fix things” that aren’t broken.

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