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Two Years In, This Therapist is Angry

Addressing the Anxiety Underneath

When the pandemic first struck, I was concerned about its impact yet able to handle the anxiety about infection pretty well. After all, managing anxiety is my stock-in-trade ability. But two years later, what I feel most of the time now is anger, so I’ve been using my anxiety management skills to figure out what exactly is going on with me.

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Addressing Racism in the Therapy Room

Ten Ways You Can Be an Ally

Everyone deserves a space where they’re fully seen and heard, so it’s critical that therapists who don’t identify as people of color are knowledgeable, empathetic, and compassionate when addressing race, racism, and identity in the consulting room. Here’s a ten-point framework for developing greater cultural competency.

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Covid Comes to Therapy

Navigating Collective Trauma

For a few years now, I’ve worked with groups around the world to address collective trauma. Our focus is usually on something that had happened elsewhere and in the past: never had I imagined that, with the advent of COVID, I’d find myself so deeply entrenched in an immediate and ongoing collective trauma. One group of men, with whom I’d been working for many years, was particularly affected.

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Dealing with Jealousy in Open Relationships

Finding Compersion

Many people assume that an open relationship will cause jealousy in both partners. Historically, it has been assumed that pair-bonded individuals who are attached in a “healthy” way are sexually exclusive, and that exclusivity is an indicator of the success of their romantic pairing. Therefore, jealousy should be a hallmark of a successful relationship. Instead, research has found that some pair-bonded partners experience positive feelings instead of jealousy when they open their relationship

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COVID Trauma

The Invisible Pandemic

What can we do in the face of our current crisis? There are no clear answers or easy fixes. As providers, we must endeavor to do what we teach our patients: in an out-of-control situation that we cannot change, we can only control how we respond to our own fear and trauma, and, for us therapists, that also means the secondary trauma we experience as a result of our work.

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Is There Meaning in Loss?

Helping Our Clients and Ourselves Navigate Grief Work

Many grief specialists talk about helping clients finding meaning after loss. But often, loss feels meaningless. One therapist working with grieving clients isn't sure how to help them conceptualize loss or work through it. Here, five therapists offer advice, explaining how they do grief work—with themselves and their clients.

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My Biggest Challenge as a Therapist

The Hardest Things About Practice

Therapy is hard work. But what are therapy’s biggest challenges, and how do therapists overcome them? Here, five therapists share the clinical challenge that tested them, frustrated them, continues to stump them, and made them the therapists they are today.

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My Client Needs Help with Something That Isn’t My Specialty

Five Clinicians Weigh In

Andrew has started showing symptoms of OCD. He’s struggled with anxiety for a while, but the pandemic seems to have been a tipping point for him. His therapist, who works in a rural area and doesn't specialize in treating OCD, doesn’t have many options for referrals and isn't sure how to help. Five clinicians share how they'd handle the situation.

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I’m Ready for a New Challenge

Five Clinicians Weigh In

A therapist is ready for a new challenge, a new context in which to put their clinical skills to work. Here, five clinicians offer practical guidance on finding rewarding projects.

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Mental Health or Marxism?

Therapists on the Fight over Social Emotional Learning in Schools

Social-emotional learning isn’t entirely new, but as more districts emphasize the curricula in the wake of COVID, confusion from parents appears to be on the rise. And in some communities, parents are doing much more than weighing this new reality: they’re staging entire revolts.

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The Playful Therapist

Bringing Levity and Humor to the Work

A therapist feels her sessions are getting a little dry and is looking for a way to bring play and humor into the work. Five therapists share how they do it in their own practices.

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The Grieving Therapist

Take a Break, or Keep Going?

What practical guidance can you offer a therapist whose personal grief is so deep that she's finding it hard to stay present for clients? Six clinicians weigh in.

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Retirement from the Inside Out

A Late-Life Identity Crisis

The loss of roles, structure, and purpose that accompanies retirement may trigger a late-life identity crisis. As clinicians, we need to assist clients in asking a deeper question: “Who am I now?”

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Escaping the Rut of Regret

Five Creative Approaches to Letting Go

A client has a lot of regret about past decisions he’s made, and although his therapist has talked with him about them at length, the client still can't seem to move on. Here, five therapists offer effective, creative ways of helping clients like these work with regret.

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A Difficult Reconnection After Estrangement

Helping an Adult Child Heal

A client who’s been estranged from his mother for 15 years recently told his therapist he wants to reconnect with her. The therapist isn't sure how to support him, since there's a history of abuse there. Here, five therapists weigh in.

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On Turning Pain into Power

An Interview with Dr. Shefali

The clinician and bestselling author discusses her new book and what it means to "alchemize" pain.

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A Simple Practice for Finding Light in the Dark

Helping Kids Remain Calm When the World Seems Scary

Given the wildfires, Covid variants, hurricanes, droughts, earthquakes and periods of social unrest that abound these days, the world can feel like a scary place. Use this quick meditation to help find comfort during sleepless nights.

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"Networker Live" with Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren

Interactive Discussions with Networker Contributors

Networker content editor Meaghan Winter sat down for a live conversation and Q&A with Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren, pioneer of America's first mental health court and author of "A Court of Refuge." The pair discussed Lerner-Wren's activism, in addition to the concept of therapeutic justice, mental health care reform, and much, much more.

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To Take Notes or Not to Take Notes?

When a Valuable Tool Becomes a Distraction

When a therapist begins to sense that her in-session note taking may be distracting her clients and impeding their work together, she begins to wonder whether it's doing more harm than good. Five therapists offer their take on how to proceed.

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Should Therapists Go Back to an Office?

Deepening Our Work “Off Stage”

Seeing clients through the COVID-19 crisis has shown us not only that psychotherapy can be effective outside the traditional frame—complete with an office, couch, and a therapist who never breaks character—but also that shattering the frame when necessary, and allowing our humble humanness to be present, is actually necessary to connect with each unique client.

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To Interrupt Anxiety, Try Singing

An Interview with Margaret Wehrenberg

Over the last year and a half, therapists have been pushed to the limit listening to clients worry, ruminate, grieve, and suffer in magnified ways. And we’ve all been suspended in similar uncertainty. Psychotherapy Networker talked with Margaret Wehrenberg, therapist and author of Pandemic Anxiety: Fear, Stress, and Loss in Traumatic Times, about how clinicians can help interrupt their clients’ anxious thought loops.

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Forging Your Own Path

A Graduate Student’s Training Dilemma

A graduate student has to pick a focus to train on, but is unsure of which to choose. Here, clinicians offer advice.

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My Client is Spinning Her Wheels

Five Clinicians Weigh In

Week after week, a client’s sessions focus on her issues with her partner. Her therapist thinks couples therapy would be tremendously helpful, but the partner refuses to attend. The therapist worries her client is just spinning her wheels in individual therapy, since all she talks about are the changes she wants to see in her relationship, and isn't sure how to help her. Five therapists share how they'd proceed.

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The Breaking Point

Supporting Fragile and Separating Couples

As clinicians, we need to keep alert to the struggles couples have had during the pandemic and find ways to support those who couldn’t hold together under the pressures created by this grueling year.

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The Pager Incident

From Therapeutic Stagnation to Growth

A decades-long therapeutic relationship shares some of the same elements as a marriage of similar length: the commitment to stay, the ups and downs, the intimacy, and the tendency to fall into the rut of assuming you know the other person. Keeping both fresh requires a strong bond, a willingness to be vulnerable, and most importantly, a willingness to learn from the consequences of your actions.

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