Blog Archives

Sort by:

COVID Trauma

The Invisible Pandemic

What can we do in the face of our current crisis? There are no clear answers or easy fixes. As providers, we must endeavor to do what we teach our patients: in an out-of-control situation that we cannot change, we can only control how we respond to our own fear and trauma, and, for us therapists, that also means the secondary trauma we experience as a result of our work.

Daily Blog

Is There Meaning in Loss?

Helping Our Clients and Ourselves Navigate Grief Work

Many grief specialists talk about helping clients finding meaning after loss. But often, loss feels meaningless. One therapist working with grieving clients isn't sure how to help them conceptualize loss or work through it. Here, five therapists offer advice, explaining how they do grief work—with themselves and their clients.

Daily Blog

My Biggest Challenge as a Therapist

The Hardest Things About Practice

Therapy is hard work. But what are therapy’s biggest challenges, and how do therapists overcome them? Here, five therapists share the clinical challenge that tested them, frustrated them, continues to stump them, and made them the therapists they are today.

Daily Blog

My Client Needs Help with Something That Isn’t My Specialty

Five Clinicians Weigh In

Andrew has started showing symptoms of OCD. He’s struggled with anxiety for a while, but the pandemic seems to have been a tipping point for him. His therapist, who works in a rural area and doesn't specialize in treating OCD, doesn’t have many options for referrals and isn't sure how to help. Five clinicians share how they'd handle the situation.

Daily Blog

Mental Health or Marxism?

Therapists on the Fight over Social Emotional Learning in Schools

Social-emotional learning isn’t entirely new, but as more districts emphasize the curricula in the wake of COVID, confusion from parents appears to be on the rise. And in some communities, parents are doing much more than weighing this new reality: they’re staging entire revolts.

Daily Blog

The Playful Therapist

Bringing Levity and Humor to the Work

A therapist feels her sessions are getting a little dry and is looking for a way to bring play and humor into the work. Five therapists share how they do it in their own practices.

Daily Blog

Retirement from the Inside Out

A Late-Life Identity Crisis

The loss of roles, structure, and purpose that accompanies retirement may trigger a late-life identity crisis. As clinicians, we need to assist clients in asking a deeper question: “Who am I now?”

Daily Blog

Escaping the Rut of Regret

Five Creative Approaches to Letting Go

A client has a lot of regret about past decisions he’s made, and although his therapist has talked with him about them at length, the client still can't seem to move on. Here, five therapists offer effective, creative ways of helping clients like these work with regret.

Daily Blog

A Difficult Reconnection After Estrangement

Helping an Adult Child Heal

A client who’s been estranged from his mother for 15 years recently told his therapist he wants to reconnect with her. The therapist isn't sure how to support him, since there's a history of abuse there. Here, five therapists weigh in.

Daily Blog

On Turning Pain into Power

An Interview with Dr. Shefali

The clinician and bestselling author discusses her new book and what it means to "alchemize" pain.

Daily Blog

A Simple Practice for Finding Light in the Dark

Helping Kids Remain Calm When the World Seems Scary

Given the wildfires, Covid variants, hurricanes, droughts, earthquakes and periods of social unrest that abound these days, the world can feel like a scary place. Use this quick meditation to help find comfort during sleepless nights.

Daily Blog

"Networker Live" with Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren

Interactive Discussions with Networker Contributors

Networker content editor Meaghan Winter sat down for a live conversation and Q&A with Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren, pioneer of America's first mental health court and author of "A Court of Refuge." The pair discussed Lerner-Wren's activism, in addition to the concept of therapeutic justice, mental health care reform, and much, much more.

Daily Blog

To Take Notes or Not to Take Notes?

When a Valuable Tool Becomes a Distraction

When a therapist begins to sense that her in-session note taking may be distracting her clients and impeding their work together, she begins to wonder whether it's doing more harm than good. Five therapists offer their take on how to proceed.

Daily Blog

Should Therapists Go Back to an Office?

Deepening Our Work “Off Stage”

Seeing clients through the COVID-19 crisis has shown us not only that psychotherapy can be effective outside the traditional frame—complete with an office, couch, and a therapist who never breaks character—but also that shattering the frame when necessary, and allowing our humble humanness to be present, is actually necessary to connect with each unique client.

Daily Blog

To Interrupt Anxiety, Try Singing

An Interview with Margaret Wehrenberg

Over the last year and a half, therapists have been pushed to the limit listening to clients worry, ruminate, grieve, and suffer in magnified ways. And we’ve all been suspended in similar uncertainty. Psychotherapy Networker talked with Margaret Wehrenberg, therapist and author of Pandemic Anxiety: Fear, Stress, and Loss in Traumatic Times, about how clinicians can help interrupt their clients’ anxious thought loops.

Daily Blog

Forging Your Own Path

A Graduate Student’s Training Dilemma

A graduate student has to pick a focus to train on, but is unsure of which to choose. Here, clinicians offer advice.

Daily Blog

The Breaking Point

Supporting Fragile and Separating Couples

As clinicians, we need to keep alert to the struggles couples have had during the pandemic and find ways to support those who couldn’t hold together under the pressures created by this grueling year.

Daily Blog

The Pager Incident

From Therapeutic Stagnation to Growth

A decades-long therapeutic relationship shares some of the same elements as a marriage of similar length: the commitment to stay, the ups and downs, the intimacy, and the tendency to fall into the rut of assuming you know the other person. Keeping both fresh requires a strong bond, a willingness to be vulnerable, and most importantly, a willingness to learn from the consequences of your actions.

Daily Blog

Strengthening Personal Boundaries

The Bioenergetic Approach

The bioenergetic approach is a strong model for helping clients understand and assert boundaries, since it relies heavily on body-based interventions and movement to increase feeling, expand awareness, and promote overall health. When working with the body in therapy, clients often become more aware of the relational trauma they’ve suppressed.

Daily Blog

Navigating the Rift

A Therapeutic Rupture and the Art of Repair

After being insulted by a difficult client, this therapist doesn't know how to proceed. Here, seven clinicians weigh in.

Daily Blog

Can We Go Back?

A Therapist Contemplates a Return to the Office

All of us, therapists and clients alike, have been forced to adapt to the reality of living in a pandemic. But as we catch our collective breath, we must confront the fact that the pandemic opened a Pandora’s box of questioning what once seemed non-negotiable.

Daily Blog

Sex Post-Covid

Healing the Rifts

Lockdown provoked a wide range of emotions among partnered people, including an increase in anxiety, fear, loneliness, boredom and frustration. It’s been hard on almost everyone. For one throuple, it provided a turning point.

Daily Blog

"Networker Live" with J.C. Hall

Interactive Discussions with Networker Contributors

This week, the Networker's assistant editor, Chris Lyford, sat down for a live conversation and Q&A with hip hop artist and therapist, J.C. Hall.

Daily Blog

Becoming a Yoga Therapist

Joanne Spence on Trauma-Informed Practices

Joanne Spence, a social worker turned yoga therapist and author of "Trauma-Informed Yoga: A Toolbox for Therapists," talked to Psychotherapy Networker about how therapists of all kinds can incorporate yoga into their work treating trauma. Yoga can offer immediate relief, Spence says, and therapists don’t have to become yoga experts to use its practices to help their clients.

Daily Blog

Grief Anniversaries

Acknowledging Loss a Year Later

It’s critical for clinicians to recognize anniversary reactions. When clients describe their experiences as depression, we naturally think of solutions like prescribing medication, talking about relationships, or finding ways to raise energy and reframe negative thoughts. But those methods to lift mood won’t be productive when the suffering is mourning. Grief requires a different process than depression: reflecting on the loss, which is real and should be honored as significant.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 55 (1370 Items)