Popular Topic - Positive Psychology

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20 Weeks of Happiness

Can a Course in Positive Psychology Change Your Life?

January/February 2006

Why Is This Man Smiling?

A Self-Described Grouch is Trying to Turn Happiness into a Science

January/February 2003
Self-Described grouch Martin Seligman, the father of the positive psychology movement, is trying to turn happiness into a science.

Living on Purpose

The Seeker, the Tennis Coach, and the Next Wave of Therapeutic Practice

September/October 2003
In this postmodern world of infinite choice and incoherent structure, what practical steps should we take to become the self we see shining in our best moments? How can we learn to live in consonance with what we value most? What Really Matters? Such questions have long preoccupied the writer Tony Schwartz, who paid a price in the mid-1980s for failing to live in accord with what he valued most. He was a tennis player and a 35-year-old former New York Times reporter when real estate developer Donald Trump offered him a quarter of a million dollars plus royalties to ghostwrite a book that became a bestseller, The Art of the Deal.

In Consultation

Positive Aging - A new paradigm for growing old

May/June 2007
How to continue to get the most out of life as you age.

Point of View

Personality and Habit Change: Are You an Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, or Rebel?

July/August 2015
In her first book, The Happiness Project, Gretchen Rubin tried to answer the question “How do I become happier?” With her new book on changing the habits of daily life, she answers the question “No, seriously, how do I become happier?”

Case Study

Rediscovering Happiness: The Use of Positive Childhood Triggers in Psychotherapy

May/June 2015
To create deep change, we need to help people mine the sources of intense pleasure in their lives, wherever they may find them.

Editor's Note

September/October 2016
Clearly, therapists must always respond with empathy, understanding, and attuned clinical expertise to clients’ suffering. But the theme of this issue is that in their urgency to relieve pain, therapists must not overlook the rich possibilities for health and growth within every person, without which even the most skilled clinician in the world can do nothing. In the end, all clients must, to some extent, be their own healers.
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Hiding in Plain Sight

Clients' Symptoms Offer Clues to Their Strengths

September/October 2016
As therapists, we’re taught to be master detectives who methodically investigate our clients’ symptoms in search of a “culprit”—the source of their pain. But if we spend too much time preoccupied with symptoms, we’re likely to miss important clues to hidden strengths, which can transform the experience of psychotherapy.

Bright-Sided

A Naysayer's Guide to Positive Psychology

March/April 2010
A naysayers look at Martin Seligman and the Positive Psychology industry he helped create.

Hacking Happiness

How Social Media Can Enhance Well-Being

July/August 2017
Both ancient wisdom traditions and modern psychological research can help us make more enlightened choices as we navigate our way through the digital age.
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