Popular Topic - Anxiety/Depression

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Exposing the Mythmakers

How Soft Sell Has Replaced Hard Science

March/April 2000
Emotional suffering, according to a new view, is a genetic glitch, successfully treatable by drugs. Depression is no longer thought to be shaped by such diverse forces as a sedentary, lonely or impoverished life;

the loss of love, health or community; "learned helplessness" or feelings of powerlessness arising from unsatisfying work or an abusive relationship. Its resolution no longer requires anyone to get meaningful support from others, to establish a collaborative relationship with a good psychotherapist, to draw on community resources, or for communities to address conditions that breed depression.

The Legacy

Inside a Family Haunted by Depression

January/February 1997
In a family haunted by depression, both vulnerability and resilience get passed along from generation to generation.

Stronger Medicine

Anti-Depressants Haven't Made Therapy Obsolete

January/February 1997

Know Thy Selves

The Inner Lives of Couples Therapy

November/December 1988

Every couples therapist knows the experience. Just moments ago, as you talked to the wife and then her husband, you were struck by how likable each one seemed. You sensed their warmth, their humor. But now you've hit on one of those issues—perhaps it's a conflict about an in-law, or something about sex, or even the proverbial struggle about the toothpaste tube—and suddenly the people whose company you were enjoying earlier appear to have left the room.

Case Study

A Cure for the Yips: Brainspotting and Performance Blocks

November/December 2015
Traumatic experiences are often the root of athletic and other kinds of performance blocks.

Point of View

Losing Our War on Stress: It’s time to reconsider our approach

January/February 2016
Psychologist Kelly McGonigal believes that stress isn’t the public health menace it’s usually made out to be—our compulsion to avoid it is often the bigger problem.

In Consultation

Detoxifying Criticism: How to Help Clients Gain Perspective

March/April 2016
An innovative way of working with people who are hypersensitive to criticism.

Editor's Note

July/August 2016
Today, with all the presumed advances therapists have made in reducing mental suffering from previously untreatable conditions, is there a solution, a cure, a fix for OCD? As with so many difficult emotional conditions, the answer is far from simple, not least because OCD appears to bear a strong genetic component. Still, we have more knowledge about how to recognize it, and how to distinguish it from other conditions that it often mimics, including PTSD, depression, and even psychosis. More importantly, many specialists working with OCD employ some variation on what two authors for this issue, Martin Seif and Sally Winston, call “upside-down therapy,” an approach that seems to break, or at least bend, the rules of what many of us have been taught is good clinical practice.
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Upside-Down Psychotherapy

Breaking the Rules with Our OCD Clients

July/August 2016
It’s now clear that much of what therapists do for people suffering from OCD actually worsens the problem. Providing empathic reassurance, rational disputation, and coping skills to manage anxiety only serves to refuel the obsession. So how do you avoid the dead end of co-compulsing with your clients?
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Learning to Manage the OCD Bully

A Therapeutic Odyssey

July/August 2016
An OCD sufferer describes the frustrating stops and starts and misdirections of her circuitous search for help in escaping the maze of her family of origin and the deep-seated tropes in her own brain.
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