Popular Topic - Anxiety/Depression

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In Consultation

How Food Improves Mood: Bringing Nutrition into the Consulting Room

January/February 2014
Learning even a little about nutrition and diet can greatly enhance therapists’ ability to help clients with mood problems.

Point of View

Emotional First Aid: Looking Beyond the DSM

January/February 2014
In Emotional First Aid, Manhattan psychologist Guy Winch provides an instructional manual for handling the bumps and bruises of life.

Bookmarks

The Pathologizing of Everyday Life: When Did Sadness Become a Disease?

September/October 2013

The increasingly blurry distinction between normal and abnormal not only makes us easy targets for Big Pharma’s advertising, but also distracts us from the larger social and economic forces that shape our lives.

In Consultation

Hearing the Body’s Truth: Three Steps to Connecting to Felt Sense

November/December 2013
Although the idea that the mind and body are inextricably linked is widely accepted in our field, many clinicians remain too focused on words to hear the truths that their clients’ bodies have to offer.

Dark Passage

Suffering and the Quest for Wisdom

March/April 2013
There’s something about healing from the deep emotional suffering that feels like death and rebirth—not the quick kind that some claim to receive in religious conversion. It’s the kind that asks us to be open to changing our contract with life in the most fundamental way.

In Consultation

Yoga in the Therapy Room: Centering the uncentered client

July/August 2013
Recently, therapists have begun to use simple, no-mat yoga practices to help clients whose minds are racing or fogged.

Editor's Note

Fretting Over the Anxious

January/February 2013
Through our lives, most of us develop what can only be called a deeply personal relationship with our anxiety. There’s a good reason for this. A predilection for anxiety was built into our neurophysiological wiring as a kind of evolutionary early-warning system for us hominids in an unpredictable, often hostile environment. Anxiety, in this sense, is like a loyal, somewhat skittish guard dog—maybe too easily aroused, but handy to have growling around the cave when intruders threaten.
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The Anxiety Game

It’s Rigged, so Let’s Change the Rules

January/February 2013
Therapists are supposed to make clients feel safe and secure, creating a cozy haven from a cruel world, right? Well, when it comes to treating anxiety, more clinicians are instructing clients to ramp their fears, while telling themselves how much they welcome the experience.

Living With The Devil We Know

We May be Anxious, but Not to Change

January/February 2013
As therapists, we typically assume that a person suffering from severe anxiety is eager and motivated to receive the help we offer. But we should never naively underestimate clients’ hidden antipathy to change, despite their discomfort.
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Taming The Wild Things

Helping Anxious Kids and Their Parents

January/February 2013
In this age of helicopter parents and protective child professionals, we can often recreate a potent anxiety- reinforcing system around children that not only rewards anxiety, but encourages it to grow and take over even more of the child’s life.
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