Popular Topic - Anxiety/Depression

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OCD and Children

It’s a Family Affair

July/August 2016
OCD in children can operate like a kind of cult leader, demanding acceptance of an extreme view of a perilous reality and offering solutions that can’t be resisted, no matter how absurd they may sound. Given the overwhelming fear and worry the condition generates, falling in line with the cult leader can seem like the best strategy—except that it doesn’t work.

Bookmarks

Have SSRIs Gotten a Bad Rep? The Author of "Listening to Prozac" Thinks So

July/August 2016
Ordinarily Well: The Case for Antidepressants 
In his latest book, Peter Kramer argues that medications represent the best, most effective tool for fighting the bleakness of depression.

Living Brave

From Vulnerability to Daring

September/October 2016
With millions of people having seen her TED talks and read her books, researcher and bestselling author Brené Brown is a phenomenon. But aside from her talents as a speaker, teacher, and writer, why is she such a runaway hit? Haven’t therapists been writing about her professional specialty—the malign impact of shame—for decades? Perhaps her vast appeal has to do with how she’s turned the concepts of shame and vulnerability on their heads.
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Transcending Trauma

Learning How to Guide Devastated Clients Toward Growth

September/October 2016
In the early days of the trauma field, clients were seen as one-dimensional bundles of dysfunction and pain, who needed to relive their trauma before progress could be made. But an increased interest in post-traumatic growth has allowed many therapists to see that insight and healing can occur not only in the midst of devastating experiences, but even because of them.
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Left to Our Own Devices

Sorting Through The Bewildering World Of Therapeutic Apps

November/December 2016
Mobile apps offer tools for everything from depression, social anxiety, and binge eating to phobias, OCD, postpartum problems, and substance abuse recovery. In some cases, they’re even being marketed as actual providers of therapy, or at least therapy-like help. Since solace-by-app is here to stay, what do therapists need to know?
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The Empathy Gap

Digital Culture Needs What Talk Therapy Offers

November/December 2016
Conditioned by the experience of life on the screen, clients today find it harder to concentrate on face-to-face conversation. They may not even see its value, feeling more comfortable with the self they can present through their digital devices. More than ever, the mores of therapy—the value therapy places on being with, forming an empathic bond, and the quiet attention necessary to do this—has become a crucial cultural corrective.
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Is VR a Game Changer?

Virtual Reality in Therapy

November/December 2016
To date, virtual reality’s most visible therapeutic role has been in the treatment of phobias and other conditions where it’s served as an adjunct to imaginary and in-vivo modalities. However, newer applications have started to move beyond the idea of altering our sense of place to emphasize altering our very sense of self. So what will that mean for our field?

Point of View

Food and Mood: What Every Therapist Needs to Know about Nutrition

November/December 2016
What therapists should know about nutrition and the food-mood connection. An interview with Joan Borysenko.

When Helping Doesn't Help

Why Some Clients May Not Want to Change

March/April 2017
Rather than just commiserating with clients’ misery, most therapists want to engage in more active forms of helping. So we try to persuade clients compassionately, gently, patiently—to make use of the various tools and techniques we know will work, if only they’d just try them. For some, this results in a quick recovery. But what about the clients who seem impervious to all our heartfelt efforts?
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Adjusting the Unconscious

Making Quick Work of Lasting Change

March/April 2017
Some claim that much of psychotherapy is a pseudoscience, promising far more than it can deliver, with lengthy, expensive interventions for the common problems clients present. What if we could quickly bring about lasting therapeutic change by modifying a few, simple unconscious processes?
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