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Editor's Note

July/August 2016
Today, with all the presumed advances therapists have made in reducing mental suffering from previously untreatable conditions, is there a solution, a cure, a fix for OCD? As with so many difficult emotional conditions, the answer is far from simple, not least because OCD appears to bear a strong genetic component. Still, we have more knowledge about how to recognize it, and how to distinguish it from other conditions that it often mimics, including PTSD, depression, and even psychosis. More importantly, many specialists working with OCD employ some variation on what two authors for this issue, Martin Seif and Sally Winston, call “upside-down therapy,” an approach that seems to break, or at least bend, the rules of what many of us have been taught is good clinical practice.
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Upside-Down Psychotherapy

Breaking the Rules with Our OCD Clients

July/August 2016
It’s now clear that much of what therapists do for people suffering from OCD actually worsens the problem. Providing empathic reassurance, rational disputation, and coping skills to manage anxiety only serves to refuel the obsession. So how do you avoid the dead end of co-compulsing with your clients?
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Bookmarks

Lost in the Maze: Finding the exit from OCD

March/April 2015
Review: The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought

Finding an exit from the bewildering maze of a disorder that confounds many clinicians.

In Consultation

The Many Guises of OCD

November/December 2014

Enduring recovery from obsessive compulsive disorder means riding out the demands of an inner bully.

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