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Resurrecting Therapy

Putting Big Pharma on the Couch

September/October 2019
In 1986, people being treated for depression were twice as likely to be in therapy as to be taking pills. Now, for every person in therapy, there are four times as many taking pills for depression. Isn’t it time we stage our comeback?
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The Addict in All of Us

Gabor Maté's Unflinching Vision

July/August 2017
Canadian physician Gabor Maté believes that addictive behaviors are woven into the very fabric of our materialistic society.
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Being There

Inhabiting the Moment with Traumatized Teens

May/June 2017
With traumatized adolescent clients, it’s emotion that gradually changes emotion—not rational explanation or interpretation, not snazzy techniques or “fake it till you make it” exhortations.

Case Study

A Cure for the Yips: Brainspotting and Performance Blocks

November/December 2015
Traumatic experiences are often the root of athletic and other kinds of performance blocks.

How Conversation Sparks Therapeutic Change

The Search for the Unspoken Self

September/October 2012
When we trust in ourselves to follow the signals of life that the patient emits in seemingly casual conversation, we increase chances of stepping outside the stable confines of our theoretical models to enjoy an unexpected encounter.

In Consultation

Love and Money: Couples Finances

July/August 2011
In these tough economic times, how do therapists distinguish between money troubles related to the recession and those that have psychological roots?

The Long Shadow of Trauma

Childhood Abuse May Be Our Number One Public Health Issue

March/April 2010
As the battles and controversies over the forthcoming DSM-V heat up, a determined group of trauma experts and researchers are mounting a passionate challenge to our thinking about trauma, its long-term impact, and its treatment.

Voices of Truth

January/February 2006
By Frank Pittman - When TV finally came, in the early '50s, the world it brought into our living rooms was black and white, and dumbed way down. Newsmen now had faces, and, as eyewitnesses, we could now determine who had an honest face and who didn't. The most honest of the talking heads seemed to be the revered war correspondent Edward R. Murrow. Now the actor George Clooney has put together a reenactment of the public clash between Murrow and the rabid senator Joe McCarthy. It's called Good Night and Good Luck.

The Limits of Talk

Bessel Van der Kolk Wants to Transform the Treatment of Trauma

January/February 2004
For more than 20 years, Bessel van der Kolk has been in the forefront of research in the psychobiology of trauma and in the quest for more effective treatments. Now he's touched off an intense debate about the role of scientific evidence in finding ways to alleviate suffering and the future of the traditional talking cure itself.

Know Thy Selves

The Inner Lives of Couples Therapy

November/December 1988

Every couples therapist knows the experience. Just moments ago, as you talked to the wife and then her husband, you were struck by how likable each one seemed. You sensed their warmth, their humor. But now you've hit on one of those issues—perhaps it's a conflict about an in-law, or something about sex, or even the proverbial struggle about the toothpaste tube—and suddenly the people whose company you were enjoying earlier appear to have left the room.

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