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Point of View

A Therapist Switches Chairs: From Clinician to Client to Author

May/June 2019
In her latest bestselling book, Lori Gottlieb offers an unusually intimate look at her experience as both a therapist and a client.

Point of View

Everyday Heroism

May/June 2017
Philip Zimbardo, the researcher famous for shining a light on our worst authoritarian impulses, has shifted the focus of his work.

Then, Now & Tomorrow

Oral Histories of Psychotherapy 1978-2017

January/February 2017
A group of innovators and leaders look back over different realms of therapeutic practice and offer their view of the eureka moments, the mistakes and misdirections, and the inevitable trial-and-error processes that have shaped the evolution of different specialty areas within the field. 
  • Trauma: Retreats and Advances  BESSEL VAN DER KOLK 
  • Couples: In Search of a Safe Haven  JOHN GOTTMAN 
  • Systems Therapy: The Art of Creating Uncertainty  SALVADOR MINUCHIN 
  • Family Violence: Out of the Shadows  MARY JO BARRETT 
  • Psychopharmacology: The Jury Is Still Out  JOHN PRESTON 
  • Race Matters: How Far Have We Come?  KENNETH HARDY 
  • Neuroscience and Therapy: The Craft of Rewiring the Brain  DANIEL SIEGEL

Case Study

Bullying Reconsidered: Helping Children Help Each Other

November/December 2016
While research indicates that most anti-bullying projects don’t work, a disarmingly simple approach has shown promising results. * Commentary by Signe Whitson
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The 5 Myths of Self-Compassion

What Keeps Us from Being Kinder to Ourselves?

September/October 2015
There’s now a growing body of research demonstrating that relating to ourselves in a kind, friendly manner is essential for emotional wellbeing. More pointedly, research proves false many of the common myths about self-compassion that keep us trapped in the prison of relentless self-criticism.

The Fiction of the Self

The Paradox of Mindfulness in Clinical Practice

January/February 2015
If we engage in meditation long enough, we discover that our sense of being a separate, coherent, enduring self is actually a delusion maintained by our constant inner chatter. Seeing ourselves in this light can pull the rug out from under us in alarming—though potentially liberating—ways.
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The Depression Epidemic

Can Mood Science Save Us?

November/December 2014
It’s time to get beyond simplistic notions about “chemical imbalances” and finally reckon with how deeply rooted depression is in the uncertainties and false values of our 21st-century consumer culture.
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Engaging the Emotional Brain

Highlights from Symposium 2014

May/June 2014
To get through to clients in our increasingly ADD culture, therapists must learn to evoke a deeper, more visceral engagement with them. At this year’s Networker Symposium, a lineup of innovators shared their wisdom about how to do just that.

Why We Cry

A Clinician’s Guide

May/June 2012
Our understanding of what happens when we weep hasn't progressed much beyond Freud's theory of catharsis. However, knowing how our nervous systems work can help guide what we do—and don’t do—when clients burst into tears.

Suggesting Mindfulness

Awakening the Hypnotist Within

September/October 2011

As a clinical intervention, mindfulness is best understood by stripping away its aura of mystical spirituality and understanding the crucial role suggestion plays in the change process.

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