Search Magazine Archives

Turns in the Road

Highlights from the Networker Journey

January/February 2017
Out of all the hundreds and hundreds of articles that have appeared in the Networker over the past four decades, we’ve chosen a small sampling that captures the magazine’s most journalistic side, conveying not so much the eternal verities of our profession, but the sense of reading a first draft of the field’s history. Among other things, you’ll find therapeutic methods that, as exciting as they seemed at the moment, didn’t stand the test of time as well as initial forays into discussing complex issues we’re still struggling with today. We’ve also added in a few examples of writing so immediate and compelling that they have an air of timelessness. Prepare yourself for an interesting journey.
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Left to Our Own Devices

Sorting Through The Bewildering World Of Therapeutic Apps

November/December 2016
Mobile apps offer tools for everything from depression, social anxiety, and binge eating to phobias, OCD, postpartum problems, and substance abuse recovery. In some cases, they’re even being marketed as actual providers of therapy, or at least therapy-like help. Since solace-by-app is here to stay, what do therapists need to know?
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The Empathy Gap

Digital Culture Needs What Talk Therapy Offers

November/December 2016
Conditioned by the experience of life on the screen, clients today find it harder to concentrate on face-to-face conversation. They may not even see its value, feeling more comfortable with the self they can present through their digital devices. More than ever, the mores of therapy—the value therapy places on being with, forming an empathic bond, and the quiet attention necessary to do this—has become a crucial cultural corrective.
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Is VR a Game Changer?

Virtual Reality in Therapy

November/December 2016
To date, virtual reality’s most visible therapeutic role has been in the treatment of phobias and other conditions where it’s served as an adjunct to imaginary and in-vivo modalities. However, newer applications have started to move beyond the idea of altering our sense of place to emphasize altering our very sense of self. So what will that mean for our field?

Clinician's Digest

The 2016 Election Is Raising Ethical Questions for Therapists

September/October 2016
It used to be an axiom for clinicians that therapeutic conversation and politics don’t mix. But in this high-stakes presidential election, some therapists aren’t so sure.
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The Power of the Unexpected

In Therapy, Both Ritual and Novelty Matter

May/June 2016
The brain endlessly churns out predictions about what will happen next, and when it comes to therapy outcomes, these expectations matter.

Bookmarks

Examining the Science of Torture: The Price of Coercive Interrogation

March/April 2016
Why Torture Doesn’t Work: The Neuroscience of Interrogation. A startling new book exposes how much more the military’s embrace of enhanced interrogation tactics in the war on terror was influenced by Hollywood, rather than scientific evidence.
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Reflections on the Divorce Revolution

Assessing Our Impact

July/August 2015
When it comes to helping couples considering divorce, therapists have a hundred ways to ask “What’s right for you?” but often find themselves tongue-tied when it comes to asking “What’s right for the others in your life?” Is it possible to talk about interpersonal responsibility without shaming clients and driving them away?
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Rowing to Nowhere

When is Enough Enough?

July/August 2015
We spend countless hours focused on how best to keep couples together, but rarely pay much attention to how to best help them split up. And we spend even less time examining how our own emotional reactions can influence their decision about whether to divorce.

Little and Often

Using Micro-Practices for Self-Care

May/June 2015
The growing interest in micro self-care mirrors the developments in understanding self-directed neuroplasticity: small and frequent works better to create desirable neural pathways than big and seldom.
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