I Think, Therefore I Eat



Skills for Successful Dieting

By Judith Beck

Why is it so difficult to lose weight and keep it off? By now, the "how" is no mystery: everybody knows the drill, whether you want to lose 2 pounds or 200. Just decrease your calories and get more exercise. And millions of people routinely set off with high hopes determined to do just that. Nevertheless, study after study indicates that while many succeed in losing some weight, the long-term results are overwhelmingly poor. The unfortunate reality is that if there's one thing as common in America as someone on a diet, it's someone who's fallen off a diet—who's gradually (or quickly) regained every ounce he or she struggled to lose, often adding pounds along the way. Why is it so hard to stick to a healthy eating plan and a reasonable exercise regimen?

From the viewpoint of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), the reason isn't hard to find: knowing what to do and knowing how to get yourself to do it are entirely separate skills. When it comes to changing behavior, especially long-term, habitual patterns, getting yourself to do something different, even when you know it's good for you, depends largely on what you tell yourself: that is, on your thinking.

For example, let's say you're at a dessert party and see five really delicious pastries. Will you end up eating too much? You probably will if you think, I don't care. I don't want to deprive myself. It isn't…

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