Case Study


Being Meryl Streep: Learning to Distinguish Behavior from Identity

November/December 2012


Debbie, who's in her fifties, called: "I'm so upset about my relationship with my daughter. She and I are always in conflict, and my husband agrees this needs to be changed."

When she came in, she reported feeling sad because she couldn't enjoy visiting her daughter, an only child who lives nearby. "It's such a noisy household. The children scream and squabble; there are two of them under the age of 6. I wish my daughter would be more organized and keep them quiet, so I could enjoy being there. I get so tense, I have to leave her home in the middle of a visit."

I didn't have a clear strategy, so I asked her to bring her daughter, Emmy, next time. Then the dynamics became clear. Emmy is a high-energy, outgoing, modern, in-your-face 35-year-old woman. Mother Debbie is quiet, somewhat distant, a loner, who needs her space. I was reminded of the movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding. Mom is a lot like the uptight couple who come into the vibrant Greek gathering.

During the hour with Mom and daughter, it became clear that Emmy wanted her mother to change and just enjoy her high-energy household. "Why can't you be like other grandmothers, and just come in and enjoy the family?" And Mom wanted Emmy to change. "Why can't you be more organized and quiet, so I can be comfortable with you? I can't stand all that commotion."

First, I tried some conventional strategies, like helping them listen nonjudgmentally to each other, but there was no movement in their…

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