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Lighting the Spark in Teen Clients

Ron Taffel on Creating Conditions for Co ...

A New Way to Engage Teen Clients

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Defusing Male Shame

Understanding the Significance to Male C ...

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  • Liz Ann Clemens on Defusing Male Shame On my trip home none of the elders never uttered words of shame but merely watched me stoically. And, when ...
  • Daryl Clemens on Defusing Male Shame While I generally agree with the proposition that shame is detrimental in the consulting room, I have always been impressed ...
  • Suzanne M on Defusing Male Shame I am curious.Is you client from Mexico,of Mexican decent, US born or has he immigrated legally/illegally? Is "Mexican" how your ...
  • Kristina Cizmar, The Shame Lady on Defusing Male Shame The problem is that defining shame as some version of "I am bad" fits right in with the globalized ...
  • Daniel Even on Defusing Male Shame Shame is a human emotion. As such, in my opinion, it is neither "healthy" or "unhealthy". We all experience it ...

Overprotective Parenting with Michael Ungar

Parenting Skills: NP0027 – Bonus Session 1

Explore the effects that overprotective parenting can have on children with Michael Ungar, director of the Resilience Research Center and author of 11 books for therapists and children. Discover how parents can best offer children opportunities to experience risk and responsibility while ensuring their safety and give them boundaries without suffocating them, increasing their anxiety, or reinforcing their need for rebellion.

After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Posted in CE Comments, NP0027: Parenting Skills | Tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Overprotective Parenting with Michael Ungar

  1. Harriet Elizabeth says:

    For the sake of parents can’t we also talk about the unprotected child and help parents find a middle way? The emphasis on the overprotected child makes some parents feel guilty when they want to know where their sixteen year old is or wonder if they should check the homework of their third grader. The one place you give guidance on how to make this balance is when you talked about speaking with parents about what their child needs to live in the 21st century..i.. Getting parents to think of their values and what their children will need to survive twenty or thirty years from now, I find helps them find the balance between being overprotective and yet their to guide their particular child.

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