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Reclaiming Parental Authority with Ron Taffel

Parenting Skills: NP0027 – Session 2

You’ll gain a broader perspective on the social context of parent-child relationships today with Ron Taffel. He’ll explain how clinicians can help parents reassert their authority by creating effective “I mean it” moments with their kids and teens and other practical strategies for parents.

After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Posted in CE Comments, NP0027: Parenting Skills | Tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Reclaiming Parental Authority with Ron Taffel

  1. jbharts@hotmail.com says:

    I so enjoyed this talk. I resonate with the importance of building or rebuilding community in the new millennium. Thank you for your work and commitment to building healthier communities and social structures.

  2. BethParks01 says:

    THIS was worth the money I paid. If all the others are lukewarm, this was worth it. I’m throwing out all my other books and using Mr. Taffel as my guide. I’m also glad that our moderator gave us the laughing early on because although some of what is occurring today seems preposterous, it is truly happening and needs guidance to correct the course. As a pilot of light aircraft, I know that a 1/2 degree shift in heading can, given time, make a huge correction to course! I’ve started presenting to kids on teen sexualization/digital citizenry and now see many in my consulting room, and usually the parents follow. Lately I’ve felt so alone and descending into advise giving and almost colluding with the parents on old and worn consequences! This was beyond timely for me, my kiddos, their parents, and the community. One suggestion, regarding getting ‘in’ with the school system, is to go see each kids school counselor. This way you won’t be presenting some of these stellar suggestions to strangers. THANKS AGAIN Mr. Taffel. Beth Parks

  3. BethParks01 says:

    oops….’gave up the laughing’

  4. eweiss33@verizon.net says:

    RON, IN THE EXAMPLE OF THE MOM WHO ASKED FOR HER SON FOR APOLOGIES BECAUSE SHE NEVER GOT APOLOGIES FROM THE MEN IN HER FAMILY THAT ABUSED HER:; HOW MUCH DID SHE TELL HER SON ABOUT WHY APOLOGIES WERE SO IMPORTANT TO HER? HOW MUCH SHOULD A PARENT REVEAL THEMSELVES TO A CHILD WHEN HELPING A CHILD TO SEE THEM 3-DIMENSIONALLY–SO THE CHILD WILL HAVE MORE EMPATHY FOR THE PARENT?

  5. 25752b says:

    What about preparing parents or educating the ones bringingin their pre-teen kids? How to approach them, the same way?

    How do you create empathy for the parents without engaging the child in a role of caring or repairing the parent?

  6. lisahartwick says:

    Thank you so much for the genuine sharing of your experience and expertise. One of my jobs is working in a First Nations (Native American) community as a community counsellor. This community experiences huge levels violence, addictions, truancy, gangs, loss, depression & suicide, which is really highlighted amongst the youth, and is also multi-generational.

    It occurs to me after hearing your talk that starting greater levels of conversation between parents, teachers, elders, students, and myself could be very powerful for this community – peer groups, or parent/teacher/student events, like you talked about. What comes up for me is the huge amount of mistrust between folk and the multi-generational, multi-layered nature of issues. What I see from the community members I work with is a demand for privacy and confidentiality – and there is certainly a place for that. AND I am wondering right now…the more these issues are kept in the shadows at a community level, the more devastatingly powerful they become.

    Can you offer any suggestions or thoughts about this?

    Much appreciation,
    Lisa

  7. Mary says:

    Thanks for fixing the problem with the rebroadcast. Ron’s idea of parent groups are great. In my professional life, I started some groups like this at a military housing area and in the school. Now as a Mom, I have really gotten a lot of help from a Mom’s group for parents of special needs children. When we first started to need help for our child, we had trouble with the way we were being treated by the schools and the mental health persons who were supposed to help us. Here I was a licensed educator and a licensed therapist and was treated disrespectfully and as if I knew nothing and was to blame for everything. Other parents, who did not have this background had their own horror stories. For us and perhaps because of these groups, things are turning around. Thanks for this great presentation.

  8. J B Dubowski says:

    Much indebted to you for this Webinar. I began seeing families as an MFT intern nearly a year and a half ago. I struggled in helping my clients for many of the reasons you pointed out in this interview. Coming from a baby-boomer perspective that had a high regard for parental and societal authority, I had to deal with the changing landscape of parenting you mentioned. I see now better where my clients were coming from–both the parents and the youth. This insight will be very helpful for me going forward.

  9. I so appreciated this conversation. I returned to practice a year ago after staying home to raise my three boys. I have become passionate about teaching parents the skills they need to connect to their children and to teach their children how to connect to them and others. I use the book “How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids Will Talk” by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish as a platform for teaching these skills to groups of parents as well as individual parents. I highly recommend it to everyone (parents or not). I find that the skills presented in this book are foundational and are as effective for the parents I see whose children have ADHD and other executive function/emotional control dysregulation problems as they are for families with no known diagnosis. I look forward now to reading Dr. Taffel’s work and adding it to my tool kit! Thank you. Susan Bauerfeld, PhD

  10. G Maynard says:

    Thank you Ron Taffel and Networker for this fine conversation. Encouraging the mental health community to embrace working together with all the stakeholders in our childrens lives is so terribly important.
    Listening to kids and parents stories for many years as a counselor and therapist you get a profound sense of the reciprical yet often unacknowledged arrangement of parents raising kids and kids raising parents. Ron has beautifully punctuated this point as critical in empowering shifts in behavior.

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