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The Case for Giving Your Client the Reins

Does the Therapist Really Know Best?

Lauren Dockett • 1/30/2018 • No Comments

By Lauren Dockett - Since the earliest days of mental health treatment, the person treating the sufferer has held the upper hand. But more clinicians seem willing to tumble off of their proverbial pedestal and enter into a more egalitarian relationship with their clients, and a growing body of evidence suggests it may pay off handsomely for both clients and clinicians.


The Healing Power of Play

Helping Traumatized Kids Feel Safe and Happy Again

David Crenshaw • 1/29/2018 • No Comments

By David Crenshaw - When children are too anxious, afraid, or traumatized to play, they can't utilize this natural resource of childhood to relieve a painful emotional state. Instead, they must use their energy to compartmentalize the trauma, keeping it out of direct awareness. Child therapists can help children reclaim this vital feature of emotional self-regulation by teaching, modeling, and setting the stage for the child to play.



How the Latest Movement Against Sexual Predation is Rattling Some Therapy Clients

Lauren Dockett • 1/27/2018 • No Comments

By Lauren Dockett - Many therapists who specialize in sexual abuse and trauma are reporting that the #MeToo movement and the ongoing accusations of sexual assault and harassment against powerful, public men are deeply affecting their clients.


Who Says Self-Care Has to Be Monumental?

Simple Yet Effective Practices You Can Use on the Go

Ashley Davis Bush • 1/26/2018 • 9 Comments

By Ashley Davis Bush - Self-care is fundamental to our ability to be our best selves, personally and professionally. Micro self-care, however, is about the benefits of making small changes with reliable frequency. The emphasis is on repetition. Small and frequent works better to create desirable neural pathways than big and seldom.


Is Therapy About Transformation, or Small Breakthroughs?

Learning to Separate Our Hopes for Our Clients from Their Goals for Themselves

William Doherty • 1/26/2018 • No Comments

By William Doherty - Are therapists more like shamans or family doctors? Explorers of human depths or more like Siri on your iPhone, just directing you from one place to another? I'm a skeptic about whether any clinical approach is good at getting clients consistently to the promised land of transformation. Maybe therapy is better understood as being about breakthroughs—small, medium, and large—rather than about transformation.


Facing a Parent's Decline

Helping Grown Children and Aging Parents Learn to Nurture Each Other

Marian Sandmaier • 1/25/2018 • No Comments

By Marian Sandmaier - Nearly all therapists will soon be working with substantial numbers of aging families, whether or not they ever consciously choose to. The question at hand, then, is how can this juncture in the family life cycle be transformed from an emphasis on adjusting to loss and disappointments to a focus on growth and possibility?


VIDEO: Rick Hanson on Living with Life's Uncertainties

Wisdom from Rick Hanson's 2016 Networker Keynote Address

Rick Hanson • 1/24/2018 • No Comments

In his address at the 2016 Psychotherapy Networker Symposium in Washington DC, Rick Hanson delivered a moving speech in which he described how becoming more mindful of our body, thoughts, and the linkage between the two can make us happier and less fearful of life's uncertainties.


Making Space for Race

Creating and Holding Connection with Black Teenagers

Ken Hardy • 1/23/2018 • No Comments

By Ken Hardy - Therapy with teenagers has to be about creating and holding a connection. As a therapist, I'm like a spider trying to lure my clients into a web that will support them. While I try to use the context of racism to help African American teenagers understand their situations, verbalize, and vent their feelings, I also want them to develop inner resources and tools for handling the adversity they face in more useful and productive ways.


What's In a Kiss?

Helping Couples Decode the Language of Their Sexuality

David Schnarch • 1/18/2018 • No Comments

By David Schnarch - Over the years, I've worked with many couples who complain bitterly that the other kisses or touches, fondles, caresses, strokes the "wrong" way. These couples need to understand that the ways they show physical affection is a remarkably salient and authentic expression of themselves and their feelings for each other.


VIDEO: How to Think Scientifically about Medications

Why Having a Hypothesis Works for the Non-Medical Therapist

Steven Dubovsky • 1/17/2018 • 2 Comments

Despite the increasing popularity of psychiatric meds as the go-to remedy for everything from seasonal depression to social anxiety, drugs are often not the best treatment alternative. In the following video clip, Steven Dubovsky, MD, explains why therapists should create a hypothesis about what might be causing a client’s suffering and investigate it thoroughly before deciding to recommend medication.


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