Topic - Business of Therapy

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We've gathered Psychotherapy Networkers most popular posts and arranged them here by topic.

Educating Therapy Clients Beyond the Consulting Room

Online Clinical Resources to Bolster Psychoeducation

Elizabeth Doherty Thomas

While it may not occur to many therapists, their best clinical ally can be the Internet---particularly for a client who needs more educational and interactive help than you can provide in one weekly, 50-minute session. Psychoeducation is always some part of the therapeutic experience, but even if you've explained the nature of depression or anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder to your client, many more questions, doubts, and uncertainties about what it all means will still remain. With your guidance, the Internet can serve as a trustworthy source of information about therapy or the client's particular difficulties.

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VIDEO: Four Steps To Get Potential Clients To Contact You Now

Joe Bavonese on how to make your website a magnet for new clients

Joe Bavonese

What if you could immediately to make your website more compelling and more effective in helping potential clients connect with you? Joe Bavonese, marketing communications expert, the first thing prospective clients want to know when they visit your website is "Can you help me with my problem?" Check out this quick video, where Joe shares a simple 4-step formula that answers that all-important first question right away, and gives people additional concrete reasons to contact you now.

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VIDEO: The Rewards of More Direct Contact with Potential Clients

Lynn Grodzki On An Opportunity Presented From Tough Times

Lynn Grodzki

In this quick clip, Lynn Grodski invites us to think entrepreneurially about how to make the most of just one of the new opportunities she sees in today’s rapidly changing mental health marketplace.

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VIDEO: Why Clients Will Pay More For An Intensive Session

Casey Truffo On Structuring A Therapeutic Intensive

Casey Truffo

With some clients, issues, or circumstances, an hour is not quite enough time to dig in. That’s why it’s great to have an “Intensive Option.” Think of the “Intensive Option” as a 3-hour mini-retreat providing focused attention on issues your clients are highly motivated to resolve. It's the kind of experience clients increasingly want

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How to Prepare for Insurance Company Treatment Reviews

Tips for Proving Your Therapy is Medically Necessary

Barbara Griswold

While treatment review has always been a part of insurance reimbursement, therapists in the last few years have reported an increase in such phone calls from insurance companies. But what’s the health plan looking for when reviewing for medical necessity? What does the language of medical necessity sound like, and how can you learn to speak it fluently? Here are a few tips.

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How to Market Your Therapy Practice Online

Attracting Therapy Clients Through Web Sites, Blogs, and Locator Services

Casey Truffo

As a practice-building coach for the last seven years, I've met a lot of therapists who are working hard to implement marketing strategies that just don't work in today's therapy environment, although they worked well in the past. So what's changed? One word: the Internet. If the Internet continues to grow in importance as a communication and information medium, as it almost certainly will, it'll increasingly be the most effective way for you to attract clients. So how do you create a web presence? Here are a few possibilities.

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Therapy Enters the Digital Age

Is Telemental Health the Future of Psychotherapy?

Kathleen Smith

More and more clinicians today are adapting to meet the demands of the digital world and fit into the schedules and lifestyles of clients no longer willing to follow the traditional pattern of once-a-week sessions in a therapist’s office. In a consumer-driven mental health marketplace, individuals with anxiety disorders want services from the comfort of their homes. For veterans living in rural areas, remote group and individual psychotherapy for trauma offers treatment possibilities that weren’t available even a few years ago. But although telehealth has been around for decades, many clinicians are still unsure about the clinical, ethical, and legal issues that emerge as distance therapy becomes a more accepted practice.

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Two Guidelines for Keeping Your Therapy Business Afloat

Strategies for Making Sure Therapy Clients Stick to Payments

Lynne Stevens

Money is an underdiscussed topic in graduate programs, supervision and peer groups, yet every therapist I know has felt the awkwardness of seeming mercenary when insisting to a client who has fallen behind that he or she needs to pay. Unfortunately, most therapists were never coached about how to reconcile the closeness of the therapeutic encounter with the fact that therapy is also a business. These days, I run into the problem of clients who don't pay far less frequently than I used to. I attribute this to two changes I've made.

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Rebranding Therapy for the Modern Day

Leaving the DSM Behind, Boosting Creativity, and Reinvigorating Your Clinical Work

William Doherty

Psychotherapy as we know it came out of the particular cultural milieu of the mid- to late-20th century. But the culture has moved on, and we haven’t adapted very well. As a result, we’re suffering the same fate as many other professions that have declined in their cultural support and public clout. Many of us are practicing in another century for another culture. It’s still unclear what we have to offer in a world that’s both hyperconnected and fragmented. What to do? Here’s a road map to a future of relevance.

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Assessing the State of Psychotherapy

Is Today's Therapy Losing Out to Science and Psychopharmacology?

Mary Sykes Wylie

The bad news was made official in 2010, though everybody in the head-shrink business had long suspected as much: psychotherapy was in decline, or even in freefall. You might think this trend represents people’s preferences for the quick fix of a pill, rather than a slog through talk therapy, but you’d be wrong: surveys have consistently shown that depressed and/or anxious people and their families would rather talk to a real, live, human therapist than fill a prescription. So in what appears to be the twilight of the psychopharm gods, why aren’t therapy practitioners rising up, throwing off their chains, and reconquering lost mental health territory?

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