VIDEO: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Your Practice

Exploring Sensations with Mindfulness Techniques

Elisha Goldstein

Clients who struggle with PTSD, depression, and other stress-related conditions may have a tough time staying engaged in the consulting room. No matter how lively your approach may be, their minds are likely to wander.



Elisha Goldstein on boosting awareness with the “mindful check-in.”


Clients who struggle with PTSD, depression, and other stress-related conditions may have a tough time staying engaged in the consulting room. No matter how lively your approach may be, their minds are likely to wander.


According to Elisha Goldstein, author of the bestseller The Now Effect: How This Moment Can Change the Rest of Your Life, keeping clients focused on the present moment in therapy is crucial to your success as a therapist. That’s why Elisha recommends a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) approach.


Elisha’s MBSR repertoire is filled with creative meditative exercises, like the body scan, that help clients reconnect to their bodies and also train their brain in mindfulness. Watch this video clip to hear Elisha explain the "mindful check-in"—a meditative breathing exercise to help clients self-regulate. It's an easy technique that only takes a few minutes and can be immediately incorporated into your work with unfocused clients.

In our Webcast series Making the Mind-Body Connection in Talk Therapy, you’ll learn the tenets of MBSR straight from Elisha, including how body scans can boost your clients’ mindful awareness, help them learn more about how their mind operates, and allow them to become capable allies in their own recovery.

Topic: Mind/Body | Mindfulness | Anxiety/Depression

Tags: depression | mbsr | mind-body | mindful | PTSD | stress reduction | success | therapist | therapy | meditation | Mindfulness | stress

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1 Comment

Thursday, October 16, 2014 3:03:31 PM | posted by Lawrence Klein
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it. If you can’t understand it, you can’t control it. If you can’t control it,
you can’t improve it.”.

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