Archives

Sort by:

Has Helicopter Parenting Gone Too Far?

The Truth About Risk and Responsibility

Michael Ungar • 1/15/2019 • No Comments

By Michael Ungar - Families that bubble-wrap their children may prevent their healthy maturation. But helping parents look back and explore their own narratives challenges the need for excessive control of their child.

Read more...

The Art of Not Knowing the Answer

A Trauma Specialist Shares Her Most Therapeutic Moment

Mary Jo Barrett • 1/10/2019 • No Comments

By Mary Jo Barrett - My very first case was the Byford family. The father was serving a six-month sentence for domestic abuse. During a home visit several months into treatment, the daughter, Laura, announced, “Dad is getting out of jail today! And he’s coming here!” My mind went blank. Her mother looked at me. Suddenly, it was as though I passed whatever strength I had to her, and she then passed it back to me.

Read more...

How Millennials are Changing Therapy

Staying Remembered in an Age of Fast-Talking and Fast-Forgetting

Ron Taffel • 12/22/2018 • No Comments

By Ron Taffel - Millennials are asking that therapists offer a therapeutic version of the responsive immediacy and role-fluidity they expect at home and experience online. If the world is in the room, how does it change the therapy relationship? Given the constant noise and stimulation of contemporary life, we might begin by learning how to stay remembered between sessions.

Read more...

Putting an End to the Blame Game

A Tool for Helping Partners See Both Sides

Alicia Muñoz • 12/18/2018 • No Comments

By Alicia Muñoz - Giving up being right doesn’t mean you give up your convictions. It means honoring a multiplicity of viewpoints. Rumi says, “Somewhere beyond right and wrong, there is a garden. I will meet you there.” For couples, this garden is their relationship.

Read more...

VIDEO: Dafna Lender on Harnessing Your Social Engagement System

Strategies for Building the Therapeutic Alliance More Easily

Dafna Lender • 11/7/2018 • No Comments

We all know therapists who seem magically able to establish a powerful sense of trust and connection with even the most distrusting clients. But are there specific behaviors common to exceptionally gifted therapists that we can study, practice, and cultivate?

Read more...

A Nightmare No More

Repairing the Parent-Child Bond is a Two-Way Street

Dafna Lender • 10/8/2018 • No Comments

By Dafna Lender - When difficulties arise between parent and child, most therapists naturally focus treatment on the child. But the parent–child bond is a two-way street, and parents come with their own history. In these situations, I can often find ways to help parents and children connect through attachment-based games that involve elements of silliness, movement, and surprise.

Read more...

Inside the Mind of a Child with Asperger's

Here's an Exercise to Help Children with Asperger's Fit In

Diane Yapko • 9/11/2018 • 4 Comments

By Diane Yapko - Teachers and parents who understand how Asperger's syndrome affects children can use small behavioral interventions throughout the day to help them learn new skills and adapt their own rigid desires and expectations in order to be more flexible and likeable to peers.

Read more...

Resisting the Seduction of "Otherness"

...Once Upon a Time in a Diversity Training Session

Ken Hardy • 9/6/2018 • 4 Comments

By Ken Hardy - When I got my doctorate in family therapy, I went to work in community-based organizations, believing that I'd change the world. Today, I realize that my work is about helping people see the insidious impact of the "otherness process." Our task poses formidable challenges, but failing to resist the seductions of "otherness" is failing at a fundamental principle of our work.

Read more...

When Doing Nothing is Everything

Especially with Kids, Learning to Slow Down Is a Precious Gift

Alicia Muñoz • 8/30/2018 • 1 Comment

Alicia Muñoz - When I got sick, something amazing happened: I let go of my agenda. Poof—just like that. In the process, I learned there’s nothing more important than doing nothing for extended periods of time, particularly with your child. It’s easy to overlook nondoing as an important activity—or as an important inactivity.

Read more...

Being a Provocative Guide

To Keep Clients Tuned In, Sometimes Our Work Has to Be Twice as Interesting as Their Problems

Courtney Armstrong • 8/28/2018 • 1 Comment

By Courtney Armstrong - The more we learn about the emotional brain, the clearer it becomes: to have real therapeutic impact, we need to create experiences that help clients learn to relate to themselves and the world in entirely new ways.

Read more...

Page 1 of 12 (117 Blog Posts)