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ASMR: Coming to a Practice Near You?

An Unusual Self-Care Tool Has Taken the Internet by Storm

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - Some are speculating that ASMR, a soothing physical and emotional experience that 20 to 40 percent of people claim to have, triggered by particular sounds and images, may have therapeutic usefulness. But with the bulk of ASMR videos being created by non-therapists, it's also stirring up controversy.

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The Art of "Selling" Therapy

Six Steps for Winning Over New Clients

Robert Taibbi

By Robert Taibbi - However we may resist the idea, we’re in the therapy business, and the reality is that our initial contact with clients represents the same challenge faced by salespeople seeking to turn shoppers into satisfied customers. Our job isn’t to make people buy things they don’t need, but to assess people’s needs and show them the match with what they have to offer.

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Pinpointing Suicidality with Brain Science

Can the Brains of the Dead Give Hope to the Living?

Charles Barber

By Charles Barber - For the last three decades, Victoria Arango has been studying the brains of people who committed suicide, and has discovered that the biochemistry of their brains differs significantly from that of people who don't commit suicide.

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How Neuroscience Can Change the Way You Practice

Knowing about the Brain Can Actually Change It

Bonnie Badenoch

By Bonnie Badenoch - Initially, it can seem like a huge leap to link abstruse and complicated brain science to the relational world of therapy. But, some day, it may seem absurd that we didn't study the processes we're expected to treat. Once my clients understand where their brain wiring is underdeveloped, they become eager to do whatever it takes to build better neural connections.

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A Brain Science Approach to Couples Therapy

Using Brain Science in Therapy to Alter Mood States

Brent Atkinson

When clients become upset, they're in the grip of one of seven major body-brain mood states, also referred to as "executive operating systems." These are more than just passing moods. They're complex neurochemical cascades, in which hormones race through the body and brain and electrical impulses fly over familiar neural synapses, shaping what we feel, do, and think. This hormonal cascade can be lifesaving in the appropriate situation---in the face of a dangerous driver, say, or a possible mugger or rapist. But in intimate relationships, it's often toxic. In my work as a couples therapist, I train my clients to reactivate the neocortex---the inner switchmaster---in the face of strong emotion.

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Mirror Mirror

Emotion in the Consulting Room is More Contagious Than We Thought

Babette Rothschild

Far from the therapy office, in the precisely measured environment of the research lab, brain scientists are discovering that a particular cluster of our neurons is specifically designed and primed to mirror another's bodily responses and emotions. We're hardwired, it appears, to feel each other's happiness and pain--more deeply than we ever knew. Moreover, the royal road to empathy is through the body, not the mind. Notwithstanding the river of words that flow through the therapy room, it's the sight of a client looking unhappy, or tense, or relieved, or enraged, that really gets our sympathetic synapses firing.

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Closing The Deal With Clients

What Therapists Can Learn from Salespeople

Robert Tabibi

What do you say to potential clients when they first call you or come in for a consultation? We may resist the idea, but in this initial phase, therapists face the same challenge as salespeople seeking to turn shoppers into satisfied customers.

 

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Understanding Clients’ Hidden Challenges

Janina Fisher on When Deeply Buried Issues Stall Therapy

Rich Simon

It happens to the most perceptive of us—we begin working with a client believing that we have a good grasp of the problem they’ll be tackling in therapy, only to end up mired in a bog of unexpected issues that bring progress to a halt.

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What's Next for Brain Science and Psychotherapy?

Looking Toward the Future of Neuroscience and Therapy's Connection

Rick Hanson

The “Decade of the Brain” officially ended 14 years ago, but certainly not the explosive growth of neuroscience research, nor the popular interest in the three pounds of tofu-textured tissue between our ears.

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