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VIDEO: Doing Self-Care Right

Sabrina N'Diaye on Tapping Into Your Innate Wisdom

Sabrina N'Diaye

Increasingly, therapists are looking for alternatives to the office-bound rigidity of traditional private practice. In the following interview, The Center for Mind-Body Medicine's Sabrina N'Diaye shares the takeaways from her work, and what it means to be a therapeutic "peacebuilder."

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VIDEO: Why Not All Mental Health Problems Are Psychological

Minding the Body Means More Than Just Taking a Pill

Robert Hedaya

Most therapists recognize that physiological processes hugely influence emotion and behavior. But according to psychiatrist Robert Hedaya, too many tend to practice as if treatment should focus entirely on the mind. A comprehensive physiological evaluation is needed, he says, before determining that a medication trial is appropriate.

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The Labels We Use

When It Comes to Addiction, Sometimes a Diagnosis is a Client's Best Motivator

Margaret Wehrenberg

By Margaret Wehrenberg - The labels we use to describe clients’ behaviors have important therapeutic implications. Sometimes using the word addiction and explaining its neurological basis can help clients focus on the consequences of their behavior. But how do we parse the tenuous line between addiction and habit?

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What You're Probably Missing in Therapy

Assessing Body Language, Voice, and More to Explore Clients' Inner States

Rob Fisher

By Rob Fisher - In therapy, it's important to notice the storyteller, not just the story. As therapists, we can notice and attend to outward signs of internal experience. The client may be looking down, squirming in her seat, or being very still, for instance. Each of these is an indicator of an internal experience as well as a set of beliefs and models of the world that underlie a client's behavior.

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Therapy Tools That Last a Lifetime

Three Simple Breathing Techniques and How They Work

Patrick Dougherty

By Patrick Dougherty - When clients focus on their own breathing, they're making the most fundamental mind-body connection. Regardless of what they're talking about—childhood trauma, a painful marriage, or just the struggle to be open with you in the session—breathing can help them get in touch with their immediate experience and be fully present, for the moment, in their own lives.

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Practicing Whole Body Psychotherapy

...And What It Means to "Start a Journey" with Your Client

James Gordon

By James Gordon - A spiritual perspective informs my work from my first moments with each person. Not an explicit religious orientation, this perspective encompasses an appreciation for the yet unrevealed potential of each person, a sense of sacred connection within each of us to something larger than ourselves, and moments of inexplicable grace, which can transform each person's work with me and on their own.

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VIDEO: Dan Siegel Explains Why Brain Integration is the Key to Good Mental Health

Here's What a Healthy Mind Looks Like

Dan Siegel

According to Dan Siegel, understanding the connection between the brain and the miraculously various operations of the human mind and body is the first step in applying the findings of brain science in clinical practice. In the following video clip, he explains why integration is the critical brain function for supporting that healing connection.

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The Biomedical Model is Failing Us

Andrew Weil on Why We Need Integrative Mental Health

Andrew Weil

By Andrew Weil - Depression and anxiety should be as fully conquered as smallpox and polio. But more of us than ever aren't experiencing optimum emotional well-being. Why is the vast enterprise of professional mental health unable to help us feel better? I want you to consider the possibility that the basic assumptions of mainstream psychiatric medicine are obsolete and no longer serve us well. Those assumptions constitute the biomedical model of mental health and dominate the whole field.

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The Internal Family Systems Approach to Psychopharmacology

Frank Anderson on Using IFS to Explore Clients' Feelings About Medication

Frank Anderson

As both a prescriber and a therapist, I believe that the chemical effect of pills is only part of their impact. The other part may seem a little weird, I warn clients, but it has to do with their thoughts, feelings, and expectations around the medications they take—in other words, their relationship with their drugs. I emphasize that for some people, more may be riding on this relationship, the source of so much hope and potential disappointment, than on any other in their life.

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Hypnotic Language in the Consulting Room

Bill O'Hanlon on the Power of Giving Permission in Therapy

Bill O'Hanlon

As therapists, we must recognize the complexity and ambivalence at the core of human experience. People run into problems when their lives are dictated by rigid beliefs that make the stories they're living out too restrictive, for example: "I must always be perfect," or "I should always smile and be happy." But permission counters these commands and prohibitions. The therapist who offers permission goes beyond accepting clients as they are and moves into encouraging them to expand their life stories and their sense of themselves.

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