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Aging Courageously

…And What Many People Who Struggle with Aging Have in Common

Joan Klagsbrun

By Joan Klagsbrun - As each of us grows older, we can try to embrace the full possibilities of aging, even alongside its challenges. In the following interview, Joan Klagsbrun, a leader in the field of Focusing-oriented therapy, explains what many people who struggle with aging have in common, and shares how a client spurred her own wake-up call about how to approach aging creatively.

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VIDEO: What's New in Trauma Treatment?

Best Practices and More

Mary Jo Barrett

Here, Networker assistant editor Chris Lyford speaks with family therapist and trauma specialist Mary Jo Barrett about the evolution of trauma treatment and the importance of bringing families into the mix.

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Therapist Peer Groups, the "Emotional Lifeboat"

Doing Self-Care by Yourself Isn't Always Enough

Patrick Dougherty

By Patrick Dougherty - In the sea of trauma that surrounds us in our daily lives and in our offices, self-care is a life jacket. But collective trauma needs a collective response. Being part of a group of therapists dedicated to talking about vicarious trauma and sharing their own experiences is more than a life jacket—it's a human lifeboat, one with more resilience than we could ever generate alone. 

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What's the Best Way to Help Male Clients?

For Many Men, Therapy is a Lion's Den of Shame and Humiliation

Robert Garfield

By Robert Garfield - Group therapy is particularly appealing for men who experience traditional individual or couples approaches as being too alien or off-putting. There’s something comforting about being part of a group of guys dealing with similar issues. For men who consider entering couples therapy a stroll into a lion’s den of shame, humiliation and failure, a men's group can be both a crucial source of support and a kick in the pants.

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When Siblings Become Caregivers

Three Ways to Defuse Confrontation

Barry Jacobs

By Barry Jacobs - Nothing reveals the fault lines in sibling relationships like the seismic shift caused by an aging parent's sudden decline. Brothers and sisters can quickly become locked in conflict about what's best for Mom and Dad. Here's how to help them forget their old rivalries and cooperate with one another.

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The Power of Peer Groups

Escaping the Isolation of Private Practice

Eleanor Counselman

By Eleanor Counselman - Peer supervision groups provide a welcome respite from the isolation of private practice and an informal, nonevaluative setting after years of formal supervision, particularly for young therapists. They offer valuable guidance on difficult cases and tough ethical dilemmas to therapists at any level of experience. And they’re free!

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Jump-Starting Conversation in Family Therapy

The Difference Between Guiding and Intervening

Mike Nichols

By Mike Nichols - How do you get family members to talk together productively? Enactments can be among the most valuable tools for getting a family's communication going. But cultivating these conversations—and making sure not to overmanage them—is harder than it sounds.

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How to Locate Your "Felt Sense"

Eugene Gendlin's Six Steps to Focusing

Marian Sandmaier

By Marian Sandmaier - On a hot August morning in 2012, I sat with 25 strangers in a former Capuchin monastery overlooking New York’s Hudson River. We were there to spend a week learning about a therapeutic process known as Focusing. I couldn’t have known then that this deceptively simple practice would alter my life.

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Shoplifting: An Important (and Neglected) Clinical Issue

The Seven Types of People Who Shoplift and Why They Do It

Terrence Daryl Shulman

By Terrence Daryl Shulman - The American Society of Employers reports that 20 percent of every dollar earned by an American company is lost to employee theft, to the tune of $53 billion per year. Most shoplifters steal out of feelings of anger, loss, disempowerment, and entitlement, and many become addicted. So why is this an important—and neglected—issue for clinicians and others in the mental health fields?

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Busting the Myths of the ODD Child

The Surprising Technique That Turns Opposition on Its Head

James Levine

By James Levine - Children diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) inspire many myths. School personnel and even parents believe that these children enjoy frustrating others and are impossible to teach. But children with chronically oppositional behavior typically are unaccustomed to articulating their needs, wants, and experiences in problem-solving ways. Here's how a collaborative approach to therapy can make all the difference.

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