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England's Grand Mental Health Care Experiment

Did "the World's Most Ambitious Effort" to Expand Treatment Fall Flat?

Chris Lyford • 2/5/2018 • No Comments

By Chris Lyford - England's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative provides mental health care to more than 900,000 people annually, and employs more than 6,000 therapists. But can psychotherapy really be systematized on a nationwide scale?

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The Tony Robbins Experience

What’s the Takeaway for Therapists?

Marian Sandmaier • 1/8/2018 • 1 Comment

By Marian Sandmaier - Tony Robbins, who will give a special session at the 41st annual Networker Symposium in March, is a pop psychology phenom. Over the last four decades, his work in the area of emotional growth and healing has influenced millions of people. But can therapists learn anything useful from him?

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VIDEO: Esther Perel on the Legacy of Salvador Minuchin

From the 2017 Symposium's Celebration of a Family Therapy Visionary

Esther Perel • 11/8/2017 • 1 Comment

A maverick and a visionary in the ’60s and ’70s, Salvador Minuchin transformed the very idea of what a therapist was supposed to be. Beyond that, he put forth a brand new model of psychotherapy—family therapy. In the following video clip from the 2017 Symposium dinner event celebrating Minuchin's work, renowned couples therapist Esther Perel shares her memories of working alongside Minuchin when she was just beginning work as a young therapist.

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The Science of Consciousness

Dan Siegel on Rising Above the Brain's Limitations

Dan Siegel • 6/15/2017 • 2 Comments

By Daniel Siegel - In his 2017 Networker Symposium keynote address, neuropsychiatrist Daniel Siegel challenged the audience to move beyond the limiting concept of the “separate self” and apply the science of consciousness to get the mind to rise above the brain’s inborn, evolutionary vulnerabilities. Here's how we can make it happen.

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May/June Issue of Psychotherapy Networker

Five Therapists Share Their Stories of Vulnerability and Possibility

Rich Simon • 5/21/2017 • No Comments

By Rich Simon - In the newest issue of Psychotherapy Networker, which came out this week, Editor Rich Simon explains how stories connect us like nothing else can. We invited five therapists—all experts in their specialties—to share their stories of vulnerability and possibility.

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The Power of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Using Meditative and Mindfulness Practices to Redefine Emotion

Ryan Howes • 5/1/2015 • 2 Comments

We Americans believe profoundly not only in the pursuit of happiness, but in our unalienable right to obtain it. Despite roughly 5,000 years of written evidence to the contrary, we believe it isn’t normal to be unhappy. But according to Steven Hayes, the creator of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), it’s suffering and struggle that are normal---and not the reverse. Furthermore, dealing with our inevitable psychic struggles by trying to get rid of them doesn’t work and may actually make them worse. In this interview, he explains the origins of ACT and what he sees as its future.

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The Dearth of Social Context in Psychotherapy

Ken Hardy on Why Therapy Needs to Address Race and Class

Ken Hardy • 4/3/2015 • 1 Comment

As a profession, we’ve become increasingly focused on our economic survival and seem to have turned a blind eye toward the broader social condition, voicing little about matters that aren’t central to our professional interest. A tendency to ignore the wider social context is reflected in our increasing embrace of more manualized approaches to therapy, predicated on the notion that cultural differences don’t matter much, and you can apply techniques more or less uniformly across different treatment populations. But no professional group is more qualified to address relationship conflict than we are.

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Taking the Pulse of Psychotherapy

We're Older. Are We Better?

Rich Simon • 3/22/2015 • No Comments

There’s been a decline in the public’s utilization of psychotherapy as a consequence of the rise of what might be called the Gang of Three: DSM, Big Pharma, and Managed Care. Today, we appear to be an atomized and poorly organized field that’s lost economic ground to other approaches promising mental health consumers improved wellbeing. But while recognizing the missed opportunities and missteps we’ve made as a profession, the contributors to our latest issue of the Networker also point to what we need to do to make a more concerted and effective stand to reclaim lost territory.

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Assessing the State of Psychotherapy

Is Today's Therapy Losing Out to Science and Psychopharmacology?

Mary Sykes Wylie • 3/13/2015 • 1 Comment

The bad news was made official in 2010, though everybody in the head-shrink business had long suspected as much: psychotherapy was in decline, or even in freefall. You might think this trend represents people’s preferences for the quick fix of a pill, rather than a slog through talk therapy, but you’d be wrong: surveys have consistently shown that depressed and/or anxious people and their families would rather talk to a real, live, human therapist than fill a prescription. So in what appears to be the twilight of the psychopharm gods, why aren’t therapy practitioners rising up, throwing off their chains, and reconquering lost mental health territory?

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Understanding Somatic Experience: Working With the Body to Heal the Mind

How Can Therapists Overcome Fears About the Body with Clients Who Struggle to Heal from Painful Somatic Experiences?

Mary Sykes Wylie • 2/24/2014 • 2 Comments

It’s the very fact that both emotion and reasoning ability are held hostage by their body’s continuing physical reaction to trauma that makes healing so hard for trauma survivors, no matter how much cognitive “insight” they have into their suffering.

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