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A Guide to Finding Courage in Difficult Times

An Excerpt from David Whyte's "Consolations"

David Whyte • 2 Comments

By David Whyte - According to poet David Whyte, the focus of psychotherapy is restricted to the individual’s biography—a good start but too small an arena for the capacious human soul. In the following excerpt from Whyte's Consolations, he urges us to move beyond the edge of our familiar, known world.

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The Courage to Let Go

A Special Story from Our Family Matters Department

Elizabeth Young • No Comments

By Elizabeth Young - A whirlwind romance turns into a troubled relationship.

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Leaning into Discussions about Race

...And the Two-Minute "Courageous Act" That's So Important

Ryan Howes • 1 Comment

By Ryan Howes - Psychologist Howard Stevenson, a researcher trained in family therapy, has devoted himself to studying the moments when racial tensions reach their peak. In the following interview, he shares the method he's developed to help individuals remain calm in the midst of a racial conflict or discussion.

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Crossing to Safety

A Master Clinician Shares Her Most Therapeutic Moment

Courtney Armstrong • 1 Comment

By Courtney Armstrong - Many people wonder how therapists manage to do the work they do. Of the thousands of meaningful sessions that take place in a therapist’s office, certain ones stand out. In the following storytelling piece, Courtney Armstrong shares a memorable moment from her own work.

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Joan Klagsbrun on Aging Courageously

...And What Many People Who Struggle with Aging Have in Common

Joan Klagsbrun • 2 Comments

By Joan Klagsbrun - As each of us grows older, we can try to embrace the full possibilities of aging, even alongside its challenges. In the following interview, Joan Klagsbrun, a leader in the field of Focusing-oriented therapy, explains what many people who struggle with aging have in common, and shares how a client spurred her own wake-up call about how to approach aging creatively.

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What Writers and Therapists Have in Common

Rekindling Our Moral Imagination and Courage

Mary Pipher • 2 Comments

By Mary Pipher - Both good writing and effective therapy rely on the ability to move beyond the self to understand how the world looks and feels to another person. Here, an author and psychotherapist argues that this quality of "moral imagination" is crucial to our ability to face the enormous challenges that face us, not only in our consulting rooms, but in the wider world we share with one another.

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In the Wake of the Election ...

Taking Heart

Rick Hanson • 6 Comments

By Rick Hanson - Editor's Note: In the wake of the turmoil of the long election campaign and Tuesday night’s unexpected results, many of us—both therapists and clients alike—are wondering how to make sense of our emotional reactions and how to get our bearings again. Putting the politics aside, what do we know as therapists that can guide us in moving forward in both our personal lives as well as our work with clients?

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A New Appreciation for Human Resilience

Rich Simon on Embracing Vulnerability as Strength

Rich Simon • No Comments

By Rich Simon - Clearly, therapists must always respond with empathy, understanding, and attuned clinical expertise to clients’ suffering. But in their urgency to relieve pain, therapists must not overlook the rich possibilities for health and growth within every person, without which even the most skilled clinician in the world can do nothing. In the end, all clients must, to some extent, be their own healers.

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Practice at the Intersection of Psychotherapy and Coaching

Using Coaching Techniques to Encourage, Challenge, and Motivate Your Therapy Clients

Lynn Grodzki • No Comments

By Lynn Grodzki - A new style of working has emerged that integrates the in-depth understanding of traditional therapy with the experience of being instructed, pushed, and challenged identified with coaching. But can a clinician effectively encompass both styles with the same client?

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Positive Psychology: Does It Really Work?

Taking a Critical Look at Martin Seligman's Pursuit of Happiness

Barbara Ehrenreich • No Comments

Happy or positive people seem to be more successful at work. They're more likely to get a second interview while job hunting, get positive evaluations from superiors, resist burnout, and advance up the career ladder. There are scores of studies showing that happy or optimistic people are likely to be healthier than those who are sour-tempered and pessimistic. But most of these studies---the basis of positive psychology---only establish correlations and tell us nothing about causality: Are people healthy because they're happy or happy because they're healthy?

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