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June Quandary: My Client Ghosted Me!

Five Clinicians Give Their Take

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - Sara, 26, had been attending weekly therapy three months, and had developed concrete strategies with her therapist to help her manage her depression and anxiety. He thought they'd developed a strong bond, but Sara has missed her last two sessions. Her therapist texted her after the first missed session to ask if everything was okay, but still hasn’t heard anything. He keeps worrying he might've done something wrong. Should he reach out again? Here, five therapists weigh in.

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VIDEO: What Therapists Need to Know About Polyvagal Theory

...And How to Use Touch in Therapy

Deb Dana

Using touch in therapy can have a huge impact on your clients' healing processes. Here, therapist Deb Dana explains the science behind the power of touch in sessions and what types of touch elicit which emotional responses.

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Is Antidepressant Ketamine a Game-Changer?

Despite Its Growing Popularity, Some Therapists are Cautious

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - In just a few years, the number of clinics administering ketamine, an anesthetic-turned-antidepressant, has spiked rapidly. After about six ketamine infusions, 70 to 80 percent of participants with treatment-resistant depression no longer experience symptoms, and usually within hours. But despite the hype, some therapists are recommending caution.

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Confronting Technostress

We're Being Smothered in Data. Here's What Therapists Can Do About It.

Margaret Wehrenberg

By Margaret Wehrenberg - Perhaps no endemic workplace condition causes more anguish among employees than the culture of contrived urgency, the ginned-up atmosphere of crisis, in which everything—every project, every report, every meeting—is an urgent priority, superseding all the other urgent priorities before it in the long queue.

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VIDEO: Addressing Climate Fears in Therapy

Moving Clients from Paralysis into Action

Lauren Dockett

In the following interview, ecotherapist Patricia Hasbach explains how practitioners can address the rise in eco-anxiety and depression.

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When Depression Runs in the Family

Being Haunted Isn't the Same as Being Cursed

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - My family is haunted by depression. My mother can trace it back in her family at least six generations. When it hits, it hits hard. My own battle with depression has focused on developing an understanding of the commonalities I share with my mother and grandmother, appreciating aspects of our shared legacies as some of the things I most valued in myself. Being haunted is not the same as being cursed.

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What Climate Change Could Mean for Therapists

Moving from Anxiety to Action

Lauren Dockett

By Lauren Dockett - In 2017, the American Psychological Association published a guide to the psychological impact of today’s grim environmental realities on clients and communities, and says therapists should expect to deal with increased levels of eco-anxiety, depression, fatalism, suicide, PTSD, and aggression as natural disasters increase. Their advice? Let clients acknowledge their sorrow and fears, and then help them find empowerment through action.

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Embracing Grief in a Laundromat

Honoring a Sister's Memory

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - It was 4:00 a.m. and I was the only patron in one of the most broken-down laundromats in the Commonwealth of Virginia. My sister Sarah, after decades of turmoil and tumult, had died the day before—a combination of pain and painkillers.

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What Can We Do to Stem the Suicide Spike?

An Interview with Psychiatry Professor and Author Kay Redfield Jamison

Ryan Howes

By Ryan Howes - Helping suicidal clients is one of the most important interventions we can make as therapists, and it’s one of the scariest aspects of our work. Kay Redfield Jamison, psychiatry professor and bestselling author, shares her thoughts on how the fields of medicine and psychology can work to better understand and treat severe mood disorders and suicidality.

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The "Marbling" Approach to Treating Depression

Three Simple Methods for Joining Depressed Clients While Still Inviting Possibility

Bill O'Hanlon

By Bill O'Hanlon - Repeating patterns can "groove" the brain; that is, your brain gets better and faster at doing whatever you do over and over again. This includes "doing" depression, feeling depressed feelings, and talking about depression. To counter this effect, I like to use a method I call "marbling," going back and forth between investigations of depressed and non-depressed experiences and times.

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