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When Trauma Impacts Performance

A Brainspotting Cure for the "Yips"

David Grand

By David Grand - One of the most common athletic performance blocks I treat is the loss by an accomplished athlete of an ability to perform a seemingly simple task that was once almost automatic. It’s primarily a sports concept, but it can be found in all walks of life. I’ve found that the medical treatment is usually ineffective. Instead, I believe symptoms can more accurately be understood as a form of trauma-based dissociation.

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Are You Suffering from "Nightblindness"?

Curing Our Culture of Insomnia

Rubin Naiman

By Rubin Naiman - Traditionally, sleep and darkness have had positive connotations. Yet many of us don't go gently into the night: we knock ourselves out with alcohol, sleeping pills, or sheer exhaustion. Our widespread fear of and disregard for darkness may be the most critical, overlooked factor in the contemporary epidemic of sleep disorders.

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The Labels We Use

When It Comes to Addiction, Sometimes a Diagnosis is a Client's Best Motivator

Margaret Wehrenberg

By Margaret Wehrenberg - The labels we use to describe clients’ behaviors have important therapeutic implications. Sometimes using the word addiction and explaining its neurological basis can help clients focus on the consequences of their behavior. But how do we parse the tenuous line between addiction and habit?

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VIDEO: What's the Difference Between Brain and Mind? Dan Siegel Explains

The Distinctions between Neuroscience and Psychotherapy

Dan Siegel

With all the buzz about brain science, is it possible to lose sight of the mind? Dan Siegel, a pioneer in the applications of brain science to psychotherapy, says that the mind is much bigger than the brain. In the following video clip, he explains what this means for psychotherapy.

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We Should Help Clients Welcome Their Anxiety Symptoms

An Exercise for Telling Your Problems "I'm in Charge!"

Reid Wilson

By Reid Wilson - The problems we suffer with anxiety often continue not because we have symptoms, but because we resist the fact that we're experiencing symptoms—doing our utmost to block out the symptoms, rather than getting to know them a little bit.

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The Science of Consciousness

Dan Siegel on Rising Above the Brain's Limitations

Dan Siegel

By Daniel Siegel - In his 2017 Networker Symposium keynote address, neuropsychiatrist Daniel Siegel challenged the audience to move beyond the limiting concept of the “separate self” and apply the science of consciousness to get the mind to rise above the brain’s inborn, evolutionary vulnerabilities. Here's how we can make it happen.

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Bringing Dreams into the Consulting Room

Helping Clients Awaken More Fully to the Life Around Them

Richard Handler

By Richard Handler - Throughout history, humans have tried to make sense of the baffling, nonlinear fleetingness of dreams. In A History of Last Night's Dream, author Rodger Kamenetz invites us to reconsider the meaning of dreams as conveyors of psychological and spiritual meaning.

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How Brain Science Helps Therapists Heal the Distressed Mind

Dan Siegel on How to Regulate Emotional States Through Mindsight

Dan Siegel

Over the last twenty years, I've come to believe that integration is the key mechanism beneath both the absence of illness and the presence of well-being. Integration---the linkage of differentiated elements of a system---illuminates a direct pathway toward health. It's the way we avoid a life of dull, boring rigidity on the one hand, or explosive chaos on the other. The key to this transformation is cultivating the capacity for mindsight.

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Marianne Walters and the Women's Therapy Movement

How One Woman Brought Feminist Insight into Clinical Practice

Mary Sykes Wylie

Marianne Walters didn't invent a brilliant new therapeutic paradigm, publish a large and magisterial body of research, or establish her own unique school of clinical practice. Yet Walters probably had as great an impact on the overall clinical zeitgeist of family therapy as any of the master theory-builders and gurus. Along with her three comrades in arms---Betty Carter, Peggy Papp, and Olga Silverstein---she formed The Women's Project in Family Therapy in 1977, once called "the first, biggest, longest-running feminist road show." It was a combination feminist think tank and SWAT team, which, in public workshops all over the country, challenged the underlying sexism in some of the most basic notions of family therapy.

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The Dearth of Social Context in Psychotherapy

Ken Hardy on Why Therapy Needs to Address Race and Class

Ken Hardy

As a profession, we’ve become increasingly focused on our economic survival and seem to have turned a blind eye toward the broader social condition, voicing little about matters that aren’t central to our professional interest. A tendency to ignore the wider social context is reflected in our increasing embrace of more manualized approaches to therapy, predicated on the notion that cultural differences don’t matter much, and you can apply techniques more or less uniformly across different treatment populations. But no professional group is more qualified to address relationship conflict than we are.

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