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Stealthy Change, Healthy Change

Three Ways to Practice Presence

Donald Altman

By Donald Altman - Helping clients make changes isn't always easy. How can we stealthily introduce change through mindfulness? It may not be as daunting as it sounds. Here are three easy-to-use practices for getting started.

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Is Antidepressant Ketamine a Game-Changer?

Despite Its Growing Popularity, Some Therapists are Cautious

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - In just a few years, the number of clinics administering ketamine, an anesthetic-turned-antidepressant, has spiked rapidly. After about six ketamine infusions, 70 to 80 percent of participants with treatment-resistant depression no longer experience symptoms, and usually within hours. But despite the hype, some therapists are recommending caution.

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When Depression Runs in the Family

Being Haunted Isn't the Same as Being Cursed

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - My family is haunted by depression. My mother can trace it back in her family at least six generations. When it hits, it hits hard. My own battle with depression has focused on developing an understanding of the commonalities I share with my mother and grandmother, appreciating aspects of our shared legacies as some of the things I most valued in myself. Being haunted is not the same as being cursed.

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What Can We Do to Stem the Suicide Spike?

An Interview with Psychiatry Professor and Author Kay Redfield Jamison

Ryan Howes

By Ryan Howes - Helping suicidal clients is one of the most important interventions we can make as therapists, and it’s one of the scariest aspects of our work. Kay Redfield Jamison, psychiatry professor and bestselling author, shares her thoughts on how the fields of medicine and psychology can work to better understand and treat severe mood disorders and suicidality.

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The "Marbling" Approach to Treating Depression

Three Simple Methods for Joining Depressed Clients While Still Inviting Possibility

Bill O'Hanlon

By Bill O'Hanlon - Repeating patterns can "groove" the brain; that is, your brain gets better and faster at doing whatever you do over and over again. This includes "doing" depression, feeling depressed feelings, and talking about depression. To counter this effect, I like to use a method I call "marbling," going back and forth between investigations of depressed and non-depressed experiences and times.

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In Your Client's Shoes

To Get a Depressed Client Unstuck, First Understand Their Thought Process

Michael Yapko

By Michael Yapko - Often when I work with depressed clients, I learn about the discriminations they didn’t make that have made matters worse. That typically leads to my asking a series of questions that begin with the word how. I’m not looking to interpret the meaning of people’s depression: I’m trying to understand the way my client is thinking that limits their perspective.

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Beyond Beige

Surviving a Battle with Severe Depression

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - Depression hits you where you live, annihilating even the basic functions, and graduating to the most complex. At its worst, depression extinguishes the pilot light, depriving you of the substrate that makes you feel real.

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VIDEO: When Sorrow Mixes with Joy

Martha Manning Shares a Moving Personal Story of Hardship, Hope, and Love

Martha Manning

A karaoke performance on a psych ward helps a mother and daughter find a way to reconnect.

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What Do Transformative Therapy Moments Have in Common?

The Surprisingly Simple Way to Get Powerful Results Swiftly and Reliably

Bruce Ecker, Laurel Hulley

By Bruce Ecker and Laurel Hulley - There's a moment that we therapists savor above all. Before our eyes, a shift takes place and the client slips from the grip of a lifelong pattern. Three decades ago, we discovered that what distinguished the pivotal interactions was that we had completely stopped trying to counteract, override or prevent the client's debilitating difficulties.

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Is Mood Science a New Way to Treat Depression In Therapy?

What Low Mood Can Teach Us About Treating Depression

Jonathan Rottenberg

Depression has been a tough nut to crack, but we haven’t focused much on what’s at the center of that nut: mood. Understanding the forces that are seeding low mood in the depression epidemic can help us better understand how to achieve better therapeutic outcomes.

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