Archives

Sort by:

What Climate Change Could Mean for Therapists

Moving from Anxiety to Action

Lauren Dockett • No Comments

By Lauren Dockett - In 2017, the American Psychological Association published a guide to the psychological impact of today’s grim environmental realities on clients and communities, and says therapists should expect to deal with increased levels of eco-anxiety, depression, fatalism, suicide, PTSD, and aggression as natural disasters increase. Their advice? Let clients acknowledge their sorrow and fears, and then help them find empowerment through action.

Read more...

Finding Strength in the Symptom

Breaking Free from the Limits of Our Medical Treatment Model

Courtney Armstrong • 3 Comments

By Courtney Armstrong - As therapists, we’re taught to be master detectives, methodically investigating our clients’ symptoms in search of the source of their pain. But if we spend too much time preoccupied with them, we’re likely to miss important clues to their hidden strengths. I’ve learned that turning a symptom into a client’s ally can transform the whole experience of therapy for both the therapist and client.

Read more...

VIDEO: Rick Hanson on Living with Life's Uncertainties

Wisdom from Rick Hanson's Networker Keynote Address

Rick Hanson • No Comments

In his address at the 2016 Psychotherapy Networker Symposium in Washington DC, Rick Hanson delivered a moving speech in which he described how becoming more mindful of our body, thoughts, and the linkage between the two can make us happier and less fearful of life's uncertainties.

Read more...

VIDEO: Michael Alcée on Doing Therapy with Introverts

What Works and What Doesn't

Michael Alcée • No Comments

Psychologist and speaker Michael Alcée says therapists need to pay more attention to the introverts in their practice, to help them manage their anxiety and realize their hidden strengths. Here's how he does it.

Read more...

The Young and the Anxious

When Worried Clients Swing Back, What's Your Role?

Lynn Lyons • No Comments

By Lynn Lyons - Lately, I’ve become aware of just how much of my practice is made up of young adults who return to therapy after leaving the nest. This pattern is also indicative of a generation of young people stuck in the transition between childhood and adulthood. Here's what I do with "long-term" clients who swing back.

Read more...

Millennials and the Tyranny of Choice

Three Ways to Help Young Clients Work Through the Real Problem of Choosing Unwisely

Martha Straus • No Comments

By Martha Straus - After a difficult case, I decided to consult with a small group of millennials, who helped me grasp what a big deal choosing has become for this generation. Here are three adjustments I've made to help millennial clients struggling with the tyranny of choice take hold of their lives and approach differently the sense of paralysis they feel.

Read more...

Embracing Grief in a Laundromat

Honoring a Sister's Memory

Martha Manning • No Comments

By Martha Manning - It was 4:00 a.m. and I was the only patron in one of the most broken-down laundromats in the Commonwealth of Virginia. My sister Sarah, after decades of turmoil and tumult, had died the day before—a combination of pain and painkillers.

Read more...

The "Marbling" Approach to Treating Depression

Three Simple Methods for Joining Depressed Clients While Still Inviting Possibility

Bill O'Hanlon • No Comments

By Bill O'Hanlon - Repeating patterns can "groove" the brain; that is, your brain gets better and faster at doing whatever you do over and over again. This includes "doing" depression, feeling depressed feelings, and talking about depression. To counter this effect, I like to use a method I call "marbling," going back and forth between investigations of depressed and non-depressed experiences and times.

Read more...

In Your Client's Shoes

To Get a Depressed Client Unstuck, First Understand Their Thought Process

Michael Yapko • No Comments

By Michael Yapko - Often when I work with depressed clients, I learn about the discriminations they didn’t make that have made matters worse. That typically leads to my asking a series of questions that begin with the word how. I’m not looking to interpret the meaning of people’s depression: I’m trying to understand the way my client is thinking that limits their perspective.

Read more...

Three Ways Mindfulness Counters the Impact of Trauma

...And Why Our Current Definition of Trauma is Woefully Incomplete

Robert Scaer • 2 Comments

By Robert Scaer - How often do we find ourselves ruminating about this or that familiar resentment or well-worn worry? It's as though some dark entity invades our mind and fills it to the brim. That entity, I believe, is the total body-mind experience of a past trauma. Healing, in essence, is the recovery of the present moment.

Read more...

Page 1 of 6 (51 Blog Posts)