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April Quandary: My Teenage Client’s Parents Say He’s Depressed, But He Disagrees!

Five Clinicians Give Their Take

Chris Lyford • No Comments

By Chris Lyford - Fourteen-year-old client Tyler’s parents brought him to therapy because they say he rarely engages with classmates or teachers, isn’t interested in extracurriculars, and heads straight to his room after school to play video games. They worry he’s depressed, but he’s mostly responsive in therapy and insists he’s happy. Here's how five therapists say they'd proceed.

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Do We Still Need Attachment Theory?

Jerome Kagan, Daniel Siegel, and Salvador Minuchin Weigh In

Mary Sykes Wylie • No Comments

By Mary Sykes Wylie - In the world of psychotherapy, few models of human development have attracted more acceptance in recent years than the centrality of early bonding experiences to adult psychological well-being. What on earth could ever be wrong with emphasizing early bonding, connection, and relationship as the foundation of all good therapy? According to some critics, attachment-based therapy neglects a vast range of important human influences.

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When Life Changes Course

In Spite of Loss, Learning to Find Joy Where You Can

Lori Gottlieb • No Comments

By Lori Gottlieb - What do you do when your life’s expectations get turned upside down?

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Dying as a Rite of Passage

There's a Gap Between How We Hope to Die and How We Really Do

Katy Butler • No Comments

By Katy Butler - There’s a gap nowadays between how we hope to die, and how we really do. More than three-quarters of Americans hope to die at home like their ancestors, but more than two-thirds die in hospitals, nursing homes, and other institutions. It doesn’t have to be this way. There’s a pathway to a peaceful, empowered death, even in an era of high-technology medicine.

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Healing After Betrayal

It Takes These Two Therapeutic Approaches

Steven Stosny • No Comments

By Steven Stosny - Intimate betrayal strikes at the core of our capacity to trust and love, violating the fundamental expectation that gives us the courage to connect deeply—the belief that the person we love won’t intentionally hurt us. This requires therapists to reach a balance between validating their clients’ pain and empowering them to improve their lives.

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Escaping the Criticism Trap

Here's an Exercise That Makes Criticism Disappear

Steve Andreas • No Comments

By Steve Andreas - I don’t know anyone who hasn’t been sent reeling from the slightest criticism, no matter how much positive feedback they get about their work. But some people experience this reaction daily or hourly. Many don’t even wait for someone else to criticize them: they provide it themselves, making it truly inescapable. Here's how to help them gain some perspective.

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VIDEO: Joan Borysenko on Sitting with Our Darkest Moments

Moving through a Place between "No Longer" and "Not Yet"

Joan Borysenko • No Comments

In our stressful, tech-obsessed, and data-based world, psychologist Joan Borysenko reminds us that the nonlinear, nonquantitative wisdom of the heart and spirit is the source of peace, healing, and joy. In the following clip from her Symposium keynote, she explains how resilience is more than just "bouncing back"—it's transformative.

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When Depression Runs in the Family

Being Haunted Isn't the Same as Being Cursed

Martha Manning • No Comments

By Martha Manning - My family is haunted by depression. My mother can trace it back in her family at least six generations. When it hits, it hits hard. My own battle with depression has focused on developing an understanding of the commonalities I share with my mother and grandmother, appreciating aspects of our shared legacies as some of the things I most valued in myself. Being haunted is not the same as being cursed.

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What Climate Change Could Mean for Therapists

Moving from Anxiety to Action

Lauren Dockett • No Comments

By Lauren Dockett - In 2017, the American Psychological Association published a guide to the psychological impact of today’s grim environmental realities on clients and communities, and says therapists should expect to deal with increased levels of eco-anxiety, depression, fatalism, suicide, PTSD, and aggression as natural disasters increase. Their advice? Let clients acknowledge their sorrow and fears, and then help them find empowerment through action.

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A Guide to Finding Courage in Difficult Times

An Excerpt from David Whyte's "Consolations"

David Whyte • No Comments

By David Whyte - According to poet David Whyte, the focus of psychotherapy is restricted to the individual’s biography—a good start but too small an arena for the capacious human soul. In the following excerpt from Whyte's Consolations, he urges us to move beyond the edge of our familiar, known world.

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