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NP0015 21st-Century Trauma Treatment

This blog focuses on discussion regarding the course NP0015 21st-Century Trauma Treatment: The State of the Art.
 
 

NP0015, Trauma, Session 4, Ken Hardy

 
Discover the relevance of trauma issues like family dynamics, poverty, and racism with Kenneth V. Hardy, the director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relationships. In this session, you’ll learn how to broaden your clinical frame of reference to address the sociocultural factors that can keep traumatized clients stuck.

Afterward, please let us know what you think. Do you have any questions for the presenter? What was most interesting or relevant to you? We encourage you to include your name and hometown with your comment, and to take a few minutes to read and response to other participants’ comments. As always, if you have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.


02.29.2012   Posted In: NP0015 21st-Century Trauma Treatment   By Psychotherapy Networker
24
Comments
 

  • 0 avatar Edith Collin 02.29.2012 13:02
    I am not receiving this webcast. Am I alone in this and what to do?
    Reply
    • 0 avatar Psychotherapy Networker 02.29.2012 13:12
      Hi Edith,
      We're sorry you're experiencing technical difficulties. If you're a paid participant of the course, you should've received an email Tuesday afternoon from Rich Simon (Psychotherapy Networker) with a link to the webcast. Try checking your spam/junk folder to see if it's there. If not, email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.
      You can also watch the session on-demand at your convenience by logging in to the site, finding the course under Your Purchased Items, and accessing any session there.
      If you signed up for the free rebroadcasts, then you'll receive an email about this session on Thursday and you'll have access to it from Friday at noon to Tuesday at noon.
      Sincerely,
      The Networker Team
      Reply
  • 0 avatar Bruce Lackie 02.29.2012 14:04
    Hi Ken -

    Always a pleasure to hear you,,,
    'Bruce Lackie, Bangor Maine
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Paula susan 02.29.2012 14:08
    Ken Hardy is a consummate professional. You are concise, clear, wise and humble. I am so impressed with the fluidity of your presentation and appreciate the opportunity to experience you once again.
    As a white woman, working more with middle class, I,too, believe in acknowledging our differences to make room for similarities. I embrace self-disclosure where necessary/appropriate because it allows the clients to know that I too am human, that I, too, have suffered, and that I have grown and enhanced my life through those experiences. It creates the path for their trusting and their disclosure of intimate truths.

    Thank you, again.

    Paula Susan
    Relationship and Trauma Specialist since 1982
    Reply
  • 0 avatar Edith Collin 02.29.2012 14:09
    Got in, great session. It is so good to hear that this work is there for these kids. I have worked with some "teens in trouble" and find them to be smart, willing to try, hungry for connection. Thanks Ken for all of the information.
    Reply
  • 0 avatar Amy Fleming 02.29.2012 14:10
    This was an interesting topic to me. I have felt ,after having some experience with the Navaho Nation and learning of their traumas, that slavery with its many, many traumas to African Americans, must have cycled to our present day with the continuance of violence. Do you have any opinions on this?? Amy Fleming LCSW
    Reply
  • 0 avatar Sara L. 02.29.2012 14:11
    Excellent. Thank you immensely!
    Reply
  • 0 avatar sara Moore-Hines 02.29.2012 16:10
    Ken,
    Thank you for sharing yourself and your excellent work with our treatment community in such a helpful way. Your work with traumatized, neglected black youth is inspiring,insightful, and powerful.
    Having worked with traumatized individuals of varied socioeconomic backgrounds for many years, being a trauma survivor myself,and being in an interracial marriage - I very much appreciate your perspectives, including regarding 'keeping it real'. I whole heartedly agree that there is great value in open discussions about race and appropriate self-disclosures that model openness and deepen the therapeutic relationship. I too have often experienced how such discussions very often help clients feel less alone in their suffering, better able to open up when they're ready, and help them feel truly seen and supported. A relationship of authenticity, healing, and growth is invaluable and, sadly, can often be the 1st healthy relationship that many survivors have ever experienced.
    Also, thank you for your thoughts about effective ways to adapt family work with trauma treatment.

    Sincerely,
    Sara Moore-Hines
    LPC, NCC, BC-DMT

    PS My husband is a long-time volunteer at Phila's Youth Study Center(juvenile detention center). I wonder if YSC would be open to having you present to their staff or be put on their referral list ...? If you would like a contact name to inquire about this, feel free to let us know. If needed, I'm happy to recommend you. (sarimamh@aol.com)
    Reply
  • 0 avatar VeLora Lilly 03.01.2012 02:30
    HI Kenneth. I am a forever groupie of Ken Hardy. I am also a family therapist of color and have been dismayed at how few of my colleges and trainees are being trained in family interventions. I think it is an important way to work with young people. I really appreciate your approach with the youth you described and the importance of being authentic and empathic with these wounded youngsters. I wish there were more of us with face creds but it is more about how one engages rather than who the therapist is on the surface. Thank you for your insights
    VeLora Lilly, San Francisco,CA
    Reply
  • Not available avatar jean tracy 03.02.2012 14:58
    Thanks you for assisting me to increase my awareness and sensitivity and methodology for working with traumatized people, and youth and how to self disclose in a meaningful way for the patient. I appreciate your search for the 'hero' in the wounded person. I appreciate your respect for the traumatized.
    Thank you also, Rich, for the excellent questions leading to greater depth of understanding. Very helpful.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Frances Doughty 03.03.2012 14:47
    I'm watching the video and it's hanging at 46:39, just when Ken is about to respond to Rich's question about therapists who are not black males--which is really important,given the demographics of the mainly white female "helping professions". I haven't had any problems with the post-webinar videos before, so I'm wondering if it's an issue on the PN side.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Tracy Krause 03.03.2012 16:53
    I appreciate the focus on systemic injustice, rather than pathologizing the oppressed, as well as the strength-based approach to recognize and develop alternatives for dealing with that in justice.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Roger Gordon (UK) 03.04.2012 06:02
    THank you for this webinar.
    I found it very confirming and consistent with my experience over the years.
    It has strong political significance in this day and age -particularly the last few comments about the neglect of those who are living with oppression and poverty, those being blamed here for enjoying a culture of worklessness and dependence on our welfare state. The pervasive and pernicious nature of poverty and the social structures which perpetuate it need to be changed.
    Great stuff Ken is doing. Like the conscientisation work of Biko in apartheid South Africa and others elsewhere.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Sneha Nikam 03.04.2012 08:46
    I found Kenneth Sir to be very humane kind of person. His simplicity seems to bring healing for cleints and that is his uniqueness. Great Work Sir.

    Thank you to both Rich Sir and Kenneth Sir. All the best.

    Sneha
    India (Mumbai).
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Maria Coleman 03.04.2012 20:14
    Ken, you had so much interesting and informative material the hour went by fast. I wanted it to continue. Great presentation and delivery. Thank you.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Barb Sherman 03.04.2012 23:21
    Ken,
    Thank you very much for the excellent and accessible presentation. As a white female professional who prides herself on being "real" with my clients, I was particularly humbled by your suggestion of acknowledging whiteness i.e. in relation to the Walmart story - suggesting that acknowledging that if I were to see Jamar in Walmart maybe I would discover myself watching my back. Thanks again.
    Barb Sherman, MA, LMFT

    Reply
  • Not available avatar Graham Hocking 03.05.2012 06:26
    I was very moved by your presentation Ken and I think Rich did one of his better jobs as interviewer to bring out what you had to offer.
    It's a very difficult area of therapy that you talk about where in most areas I suspect is undertaken by some of the least experienced but well meaning therapists. I think you gave very clear simple guidelines that can be readily followed by all therapists that want to work in this area. The point you bring up near the end of including other family members no matter how uninvolved they seem is also very important and critical to the ongoing care of the young person.
    Thank you again both for one of the most sensitive presentations I have seen on networker.
    Graham Hocking Australia
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Joy Lang 03.05.2012 11:59
    Wow! That was a fantastic presentation. I so appreciate hearing your perspective Ken as a therapist doing some very difficult work with a difficult population. While your clientèle and mine are somewhat different, there were some parallels regarding the children who are in foster care that I work with. Thank you so much for your presentation and all that you gave me to think about.
    Joy Lang, MSW, RSW
    Waterloo, ON Canada
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Karen Allen 03.06.2012 09:16
    Ken, this presentation was very helpful for organizing the wealth of knowledge available for understanding the process of trauma therapy. I appreciated the insight I gained towards applying trauma therapy to adolescents as much of my work involves younger children. I felt validated in my work by your comment to not push or rush the client before they signal they are ready to move forward. Timing is critical to a positive outcome.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Lee Budahn 03.06.2012 10:52
    Thank you, Dr. Hardy. I have admired your work for a couple of decades now. I use your film, The Psychological Residuals of Slavery, in training the next generation of counselors and therapists.
    Reply
  • Not available avatar Ravi Chandra 03.06.2012 12:19
    Thanks to Ken for a remarkable lecture based on his work and insight. I look forward to hearing more from him - and will look up that film, The Psychological Residuals of Slavery, that a commenter mentioned. I only wished there was a mention of other resources by Dr. Hardy.

    Thanks to Rich for again moderating an excellent discussion.
    Reply
  • 0 avatar Eva Berlander 03.13.2012 06:14
    Thank you! My chest is warm and I feel such a happy feeling that you Ken see their essence - something that probably no one have done before! Thank God for therapist like you!! I love the way you help them make sense and how you look at them with warm and loving eyes - so they can change. - as we all can when we behave in a not friendly or respectful way!
    Thanks Eva ( Sweden)
    Reply
  • 0 avatar Lynn Lidbury 05.15.2012 11:29
    Hello Ken,

    This class was helpful for me on both a personal and a professional level and I do have some questions for you. First I will give you my background as a platform to understand my questions. I am a white female counselor in private practice in a southern suburb of Chicago with 80% of my clients are black. I work with a lot of foster children, but also with adults and find I am getting adults in my practice that have been traumatized by growing in the violent gettos of Chicago - where the rate of violence is growing dramatically in recent years. I was a treatment foster mother for 10 years and have two black sons. I had one 19 hispanic son, Johnathan, who was violently murdered 7 years ago by a black/hispanic mix 21 year old man. Johnathan was stabbed 38 times and his stomach was cut open in his apartment in Chicago. He had been dealing marijuana to his college friends and the building matenance man and his nephew, Casmier, came to buy some marijuana and the Casmier was said to murder Johnathan in order to rob him. I have always thought there was more to this story than robbery or the dealing of marijuana. Others have talked about the Casmier being threatened by Johnthan since is was smart, musical, friendly, etc. Your talk about feeling disrespected and the trauma of poverty and race that is underneath this feeling hit home for a reason. I have the need to make sense of the Casmier's behavior and to do something to make an impact. I have read Perry's book: The Boy That Was Raised As A Dog, and out of all the reading I have done, the impact of family trauma has made the most sense. I have started a foundation to teach at risk kids stringed instruments to impact the violence. In therapy I do self disclose in a similar manner that you do and find that it makes a huge difference. What readings or understanding can you give me to help me process this experience?
    Reply
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