Bringing Out Your Inner Performer

How to Create a Therapy Experience Your Clients Will Remember

Robert Taibbi • 6/5/2017

By Robert Taibbi - In many ways, therapy resembles improv more than stand-up comedy, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t take a lesson from Louis C.K. and pay closer attention to not only what we say, but how we say it, ensuring that we, too, can maximize our impact, even if it’s on an audience of one.

Daily Blog

What Therapists Can Learn from Improv

Three Rules for Being More Energetic and Interactive in Sessions

Robert Taibbi • 5/16/2017

By Robert Taibbi - I started improv several years ago. It showed me how to be freer and more creative, providing a unique way of approaching relationships that's generous rather than closed, organic rather than scripted. While the theory and skills of therapy form the foundation of clinical practice, we have little foundation for the creativity that good therapy demands. Doing improv made me wonder whether applying these rules might make me more creative in my work and personal life.

Daily Blog

In Consultation

Expanding Your Expressive Range

Robert Taibbi • 5/8/2017

What therapists can learn from performers.

Magazine Article

The Essential Tasks of Brief Therapy

Meeting Treatment Goals in Just Eight Sessions

Robert Taibbi • 9/7/2016

By Robert Taibbi - We all know the essential tasks of the first session in any kind of therapy: building rapport and a sense of collaboration, assessing and diagnosing, and formulating and offering a preliminary treatment plan. The tasks in brief therapy aren't different, but they're done in less time--meaning that therapists need to get to work immediately, and there's little leeway for mistakes.

Daily Blog

Marketing Your Therapy Practice

Six Steps for Winning Over Potential Therapy Clients

Robert Taibbi • 8/4/2016

By Robert Taibbi - However we may resist the idea, we’re in the therapy business, and the reality is that our initial contact with clients represents the same challenge faced by salespeople seeking to turn shoppers into satisfied customers. What good, responsible salespeople know is that their job isn’t to make people buy things they don’t need, but to assess people’s needs and show them the match with what they have to offer. But how do you do it? Here are some steps to help you make a good sales pitch.

Daily Blog
Copyright:
1/16/2015
Author:
BOB TAIBBI, LCSW
Product:
RNV047580

Closing The Deal With Clients

What We Can Learn from Salespeople

Robert Taibbi • 9/5/2013

What do you say to potential clients when they first call you or come in for a consultation? We may resist the idea, but in this initial phase, therapists face the same challenge as salespeople seeking to turn shoppers into satisfied customers.

Magazine Article
Copyright:
1/8/2013
Author:
BOB TAIBBI, LCSW
Product:
NOS095541

In Consultation

The Art of the First Session: Getting It Right From the Start

Robert Taibbi • 11/6/2012

You never get a second chance to have a first session, so make the most of it.

Magazine Article

The Tao of Improv

Embracing life on the edge

Robert Taibbi • 1/1/2009

Improvisational theater offers a unique way of approaching relationships—and psychotherapy—that's generous rather than closed, support rather than competitive, organic rather than scripted.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 2 (11 Items)
Copyright:
1/16/2015
Author:
BOB TAIBBI, LCSW
Product:
RNV047580
Copyright:
1/8/2013
Author:
BOB TAIBBI, LCSW
Product:
NOS095541
Page 1 of 1 (2 Items)

Bringing Out Your Inner Performer

How to Create a Therapy Experience Your Clients Will Remember

Robert Taibbi • 6/5/2017

By Robert Taibbi - In many ways, therapy resembles improv more than stand-up comedy, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t take a lesson from Louis C.K. and pay closer attention to not only what we say, but how we say it, ensuring that we, too, can maximize our impact, even if it’s on an audience of one.

Daily Blog

What Therapists Can Learn from Improv

Three Rules for Being More Energetic and Interactive in Sessions

Robert Taibbi • 5/16/2017

By Robert Taibbi - I started improv several years ago. It showed me how to be freer and more creative, providing a unique way of approaching relationships that's generous rather than closed, organic rather than scripted. While the theory and skills of therapy form the foundation of clinical practice, we have little foundation for the creativity that good therapy demands. Doing improv made me wonder whether applying these rules might make me more creative in my work and personal life.

Daily Blog

The Essential Tasks of Brief Therapy

Meeting Treatment Goals in Just Eight Sessions

Robert Taibbi • 9/7/2016

By Robert Taibbi - We all know the essential tasks of the first session in any kind of therapy: building rapport and a sense of collaboration, assessing and diagnosing, and formulating and offering a preliminary treatment plan. The tasks in brief therapy aren't different, but they're done in less time--meaning that therapists need to get to work immediately, and there's little leeway for mistakes.

Daily Blog

Marketing Your Therapy Practice

Six Steps for Winning Over Potential Therapy Clients

Robert Taibbi • 8/4/2016

By Robert Taibbi - However we may resist the idea, we’re in the therapy business, and the reality is that our initial contact with clients represents the same challenge faced by salespeople seeking to turn shoppers into satisfied customers. What good, responsible salespeople know is that their job isn’t to make people buy things they don’t need, but to assess people’s needs and show them the match with what they have to offer. But how do you do it? Here are some steps to help you make a good sales pitch.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1 (4 Items)

In Consultation

Expanding Your Expressive Range

Robert Taibbi • 5/8/2017

What therapists can learn from performers.

Magazine Article

Closing The Deal With Clients

What We Can Learn from Salespeople

Robert Taibbi • 9/5/2013

What do you say to potential clients when they first call you or come in for a consultation? We may resist the idea, but in this initial phase, therapists face the same challenge as salespeople seeking to turn shoppers into satisfied customers.

Magazine Article

In Consultation

The Art of the First Session: Getting It Right From the Start

Robert Taibbi • 11/6/2012

You never get a second chance to have a first session, so make the most of it.

Magazine Article

The Tao of Improv

Embracing life on the edge

Robert Taibbi • 1/1/2009

Improvisational theater offers a unique way of approaching relationships—and psychotherapy—that's generous rather than closed, support rather than competitive, organic rather than scripted.

Magazine Article

In Consultation

The 4 Stages of Supervision: Establishing a Lasting Relationship with Your Supervisee

Robert Taibbi • 9/1/2007

Effective clinical supervision requires an understanding of how supervisees develop and mature.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (5 Items)
Robert Taibbi, LCSW, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 40 years of experience primarily in community mental health working with couples and families as a clinician, supervisor and clinical director. Bob is the author of Clinical Supervision: A Four-Stage Process of Growth and Discovery and Clinical Social Work Supervision. Bob is the author of four other books: Doing Couples Therapy: Craft and Creativity in Work with Intimate Partners; Doing Family Therapy: Craft and Creativity in Clinical Practice, now in its 3rd edition and recently translated into Chinese and Portuguese; Boot Camp Therapy: Action-Oriented Brief Treatment of Anxiety, Anger & Depression; and the forthcoming The Art of the First Session.

Bob is also an online columnist for Psychotherapy Today magazine, has published over 300 magazine and journal articles, and has contributed several book chapters including Favorite Counseling Techniques: 55 Masters Share Their Secrets, which cited him among the top 100 therapists in the country. He served as teen advice columnist for Current Health, a contributing editor to Your Health and Fitness, and has received three national writing awards for Best Consumer Health Writing.

Bob is a graduate of Rutgers University and the University of South Carolina, and has served as adjunct professor at several universities. He provides trainings nationally and internationally in the areas of supervision, couple therapy, family therapy, and brief therapy. He is currently in private practice in Charlottesville, Virginia.