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Judith Beck on the CBT Approach to Depression

...And Her Response to Therapists Who Think It's Too Structured and Restrictive

Judith Beck • 8/3/2018

By Judith Beck - In the following interview with CBT pioneer Judith Beck, she explains the basics of the cognitive therapy approach to depression, including its step-by-step process, why homework is so important, and how good CBT therapists confront the possibility of relapse from the very first session.

Daily Blog

Why Don't Diets Work? CBT's Judith Beck Has the Answer

A Five-Step Process for Mastering Dieting Skills

Judith Beck • 3/20/2018

Judith Beck - Why is it so hard to stick to a healthy eating plan and a reasonable exercise regimen? From the viewpoint of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), when it comes to changing behavior, especially long-term, habitual patterns, getting yourself to do something different, even when you know it's good for you, depends largely on what you tell yourself: that is, on your thinking.

Daily Blog

A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Solution for Losing Weight

Judith Beck on Why CBT Could Be Your Best Weight Loss Strategy

Judith Beck • 8/11/2015

Why is it so difficult to lose weight and keep it off? From the viewpoint of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), the reason isn’t hard to find: knowing what to do and knowing how to get yourself to do it are entirely separate skills. When it comes to changing behavior, especially long-term, habitual patterns, getting yourself to do something different, even when you know it’s good for you, depends largely on what you tell yourself: that is, on your thinking. Outlined here is a program I’ve developed for nonpsychiatric (and noneating-disordered) individuals that utilizes the basic principles of CBT to address overeating directly.

Daily Blog

The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach to Overcoming Depression

Judith Beck Explains Her Method of Depression Treatment

Judith Beck • 1/16/2015

The hallmark of cognitive therapy is understanding clients’ reactions—emotional and behavioral—in terms of how they interpret situations. The repeated themes in people’s thinking and behavior finally make sense once we understand the basic way they view themselves, their world, and other people. But cognitive therapy goes beyond helping people understand their thoughts and behaviors in sessions. People actually get better by making small changes in their thinking and behavior every day. As therapy progresses, homework assignments and relapse prevention become essential parts of the approach.

Daily Blog

The Power of Small Changes

A Step-by-Step Approach to Treating Depression: An Interview with Judith Beck

Judith Beck • 11/12/2014

Relapse prevention begins in the first session, when we tell clients that we want to help them become their own therapists.

Magazine Article
Copyright:
12/13/2013
Authors:
JUDITH BECK, PH.D.
 
DEBORAH BECK BUSIS, LSW
Product:
RNV047785
Type:
$49.99 USD     $29.99 USD

I Think, Therefore I Eat

Skills for Successful Dieting

Judith Beck • 1/1/2011

From the viewpoint of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, the reason that dieters so frequently fail to stick to their healthy eating plans is simple: knowing what to do and knowing how to get yourself to do it are two entirely different skills.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (7 Items)
Copyright:
12/13/2013
Authors:
JUDITH BECK, PH.D.
 
DEBORAH BECK BUSIS, LSW
Product:
RNV047785
Type:
$49.99 USD     $29.99 USD
Page 1 of 1

Judith Beck on the CBT Approach to Depression

...And Her Response to Therapists Who Think It's Too Structured and Restrictive

Judith Beck • 8/3/2018

By Judith Beck - In the following interview with CBT pioneer Judith Beck, she explains the basics of the cognitive therapy approach to depression, including its step-by-step process, why homework is so important, and how good CBT therapists confront the possibility of relapse from the very first session.

Daily Blog

Why Don't Diets Work? CBT's Judith Beck Has the Answer

A Five-Step Process for Mastering Dieting Skills

Judith Beck • 3/20/2018

Judith Beck - Why is it so hard to stick to a healthy eating plan and a reasonable exercise regimen? From the viewpoint of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), when it comes to changing behavior, especially long-term, habitual patterns, getting yourself to do something different, even when you know it's good for you, depends largely on what you tell yourself: that is, on your thinking.

Daily Blog

A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Solution for Losing Weight

Judith Beck on Why CBT Could Be Your Best Weight Loss Strategy

Judith Beck • 8/11/2015

Why is it so difficult to lose weight and keep it off? From the viewpoint of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), the reason isn’t hard to find: knowing what to do and knowing how to get yourself to do it are entirely separate skills. When it comes to changing behavior, especially long-term, habitual patterns, getting yourself to do something different, even when you know it’s good for you, depends largely on what you tell yourself: that is, on your thinking. Outlined here is a program I’ve developed for nonpsychiatric (and noneating-disordered) individuals that utilizes the basic principles of CBT to address overeating directly.

Daily Blog

The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach to Overcoming Depression

Judith Beck Explains Her Method of Depression Treatment

Judith Beck • 1/16/2015

The hallmark of cognitive therapy is understanding clients’ reactions—emotional and behavioral—in terms of how they interpret situations. The repeated themes in people’s thinking and behavior finally make sense once we understand the basic way they view themselves, their world, and other people. But cognitive therapy goes beyond helping people understand their thoughts and behaviors in sessions. People actually get better by making small changes in their thinking and behavior every day. As therapy progresses, homework assignments and relapse prevention become essential parts of the approach.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1 (4 Items)

The Power of Small Changes

A Step-by-Step Approach to Treating Depression: An Interview with Judith Beck

Judith Beck • 11/12/2014

Relapse prevention begins in the first session, when we tell clients that we want to help them become their own therapists.

Magazine Article

I Think, Therefore I Eat

Skills for Successful Dieting

Judith Beck • 1/1/2011

From the viewpoint of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, the reason that dieters so frequently fail to stick to their healthy eating plans is simple: knowing what to do and knowing how to get yourself to do it are two entirely different skills.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (2 Items)
Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is the Director of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research in suburban Philadelphia and Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania where she teaches psychiatry residents. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982.

Dr. Beck directs the three major functions of the Beck Institute: educating professionals in cognitive therapy through a variety of training programs, clinical care and research. She currently divides her time between administration, supervision and teaching, clinical work, program development, research and writing. Dr. Beck is a consultant for several NIMH studies and presents workshops nationally and internationally on cognitive therapy for a wide variety of psychiatric disorders and medical problems with psychological components. She has written numerous articles and chapters on various applications of cognitive therapy. Dr. Beck is the author of the primary text in the field, Cognitive Therapy: Basics and Beyond, which has been translated into 20 languages. Her other books include Cognitive Therapy for Challenging Problems: What to Do when the Basics Don't Work, The Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy, and Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders. She has written a cognitive behavioral book and workbook for consumers, The Beck Diet Solution: Training Your Brain to Think Like a Thin Person, and her latest book is The Complete Beck Diet for Life (for more information about the diet books and diet workshops, visit www.beckdietsolution.com).

Dr. Beck is a Distinguished Founding Fellow and Past President of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.