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The Power of Permission

Why Giving Up the Need to See Clients Change Can Actually Produce Results

Bill O'Hanlon • 11/28/2017

By Bill O'Hanlon - People run into problems when their lives are dictated by rigid beliefs that make the stories they're living out too restrictive. Permission counters these commands and prohibitions. At the most basic level, we must discover how to perform the balancing act of simultaneously giving up the need to see clients change while holding open the possibility of change.

Daily Blog

Breaking the Cycle of Depression

Bill O'Hanlon on the "Marbling" Technique for Working with Depressed Clients

Bill O'Hanlon • 2/3/2016

Depressed clients repeat the same thoughts, activities, feelings, and experiences again and again, as if entranced. Good depression treatment is largely about awakening them from this bad trance.

Daily Blog

Hypnotic Language in the Consulting Room

Bill O'Hanlon on the Power of Giving Permission in Therapy

Bill O'Hanlon • 3/12/2015

As therapists, we must recognize the complexity and ambivalence at the core of human experience. People run into problems when their lives are dictated by rigid beliefs that make the stories they're living out too restrictive, for example: "I must always be perfect," or "I should always smile and be happy." But permission counters these commands and prohibitions. The therapist who offers permission goes beyond accepting clients as they are and moves into encouraging them to expand their life stories and their sense of themselves.

Daily Blog

Escaping the Trance of Depression

Using Bill O'Hanlon's Marbling Technique with Clients

Bill O'Hanlon • 11/28/2014

In recent years, we’ve learned that repeating patterns of experience, attention, conversation, and behavior can “groove” the brain; that is, your brain gets better and faster at doing whatever you do over and over again. This includes “doing” depression, feeling depressed feelings, talking about depression, and so forth. Thus, we can unintentionally help our clients get better at doing depression by focusing exclusively on it. To counter this effect, I like to use a method that I call “marbling.”

Daily Blog

Out of the Tunnel

Escaping the Trance of Depression

Bill O'Hanlon • 11/12/2014

Depressed clients repeat the same thoughts, activities, feelings, and experiences again and again, as if entranced. Good depression treatment is largely about awakening them from this bad trance.

Magazine Article

Treating Complex Depression Symptoms with Bill O’Hanlon’s “Exceptions" Technique

Bill O'Hanlon • 10/22/2014

Rarely is someone always depressed, or always empty, or always without energy, or always suicidal. If you (or the person you’re helping) explores exceptions to the usual problem, feeling, or thought, you can usually find moments when it’s not occurring. A lot can be learned from these exceptions that may be helpful in finding relief from the depression.

Daily Blog
Copyright:
1/24/2013
Authors:
KATY BUTLER, MA
 
BARRY DUNCAN, PSY.D.
 
BILL O'HANLON, MS, LMFT
 
YVONNE DOLAN, MA
 
DOUGLAS FLEMONS, PHD, LMFT
Product:
NRC095549
Type:
$39.99 USD

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Turning Ambivalence into Possibility

Bill O'Hanlon • 1/1/2003

At the most basic level, we must discover how to perform the balancing act of simultaneously giving up the need to see clients change while holding open the possibility of change.

Magazine Article

The Dog Ate It

When Clients Don't Do Their Homework

Bill O'Hanlon • 5/29/1998

How do you get clients to do homework assignments? For one, please don't call them homework assignments.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (9 Items)
Copyright:
1/24/2013
Authors:
KATY BUTLER, MA
 
BARRY DUNCAN, PSY.D.
 
BILL O'HANLON, MS, LMFT
 
YVONNE DOLAN, MA
 
DOUGLAS FLEMONS, PHD, LMFT
Product:
NRC095549
Type:
$39.99 USD
Page 1 of 1

The Power of Permission

Why Giving Up the Need to See Clients Change Can Actually Produce Results

Bill O'Hanlon • 11/28/2017

By Bill O'Hanlon - People run into problems when their lives are dictated by rigid beliefs that make the stories they're living out too restrictive. Permission counters these commands and prohibitions. At the most basic level, we must discover how to perform the balancing act of simultaneously giving up the need to see clients change while holding open the possibility of change.

Daily Blog

Breaking the Cycle of Depression

Bill O'Hanlon on the "Marbling" Technique for Working with Depressed Clients

Bill O'Hanlon • 2/3/2016

Depressed clients repeat the same thoughts, activities, feelings, and experiences again and again, as if entranced. Good depression treatment is largely about awakening them from this bad trance.

Daily Blog

Hypnotic Language in the Consulting Room

Bill O'Hanlon on the Power of Giving Permission in Therapy

Bill O'Hanlon • 3/12/2015

As therapists, we must recognize the complexity and ambivalence at the core of human experience. People run into problems when their lives are dictated by rigid beliefs that make the stories they're living out too restrictive, for example: "I must always be perfect," or "I should always smile and be happy." But permission counters these commands and prohibitions. The therapist who offers permission goes beyond accepting clients as they are and moves into encouraging them to expand their life stories and their sense of themselves.

Daily Blog

Escaping the Trance of Depression

Using Bill O'Hanlon's Marbling Technique with Clients

Bill O'Hanlon • 11/28/2014

In recent years, we’ve learned that repeating patterns of experience, attention, conversation, and behavior can “groove” the brain; that is, your brain gets better and faster at doing whatever you do over and over again. This includes “doing” depression, feeling depressed feelings, talking about depression, and so forth. Thus, we can unintentionally help our clients get better at doing depression by focusing exclusively on it. To counter this effect, I like to use a method that I call “marbling.”

Daily Blog

Treating Complex Depression Symptoms with Bill O’Hanlon’s “Exceptions" Technique

Bill O'Hanlon • 10/22/2014

Rarely is someone always depressed, or always empty, or always without energy, or always suicidal. If you (or the person you’re helping) explores exceptions to the usual problem, feeling, or thought, you can usually find moments when it’s not occurring. A lot can be learned from these exceptions that may be helpful in finding relief from the depression.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1 (5 Items)

Out of the Tunnel

Escaping the Trance of Depression

Bill O'Hanlon • 11/12/2014

Depressed clients repeat the same thoughts, activities, feelings, and experiences again and again, as if entranced. Good depression treatment is largely about awakening them from this bad trance.

Magazine Article

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Turning Ambivalence into Possibility

Bill O'Hanlon • 1/1/2003

At the most basic level, we must discover how to perform the balancing act of simultaneously giving up the need to see clients change while holding open the possibility of change.

Magazine Article

The Dog Ate It

When Clients Don't Do Their Homework

Bill O'Hanlon • 5/29/1998

How do you get clients to do homework assignments? For one, please don't call them homework assignments.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (3 Items)
Bill O'Hanlon, MS, LMFT, has authored or co-authored 31 books, the latest being Quick Steps to Resolving Trauma (W.W. Norton, 2010). He has published 59 articles or book chapters. His books have been translated into 16 languages. He has appeared on Oprah (with his book Do One Thing Different), The Today Show, and a variety of other television and radio programs.

For the past 30+ years, Bill has given over 2,000 talks around the world. He has been a top-rated presenter at many national conferences and was awarded the Outstanding Mental Health Educator of the Year in 2001 by the New England Educational Institute. He is a Licensed Mental Health Professional, Certified Professional Counselor, and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Bill is clinical member of AAMFT (and winner of the 2003 New Mexico AMFT Distinguished Service Award), certified by the National Board of Certified Clinical Hypnotherapists and a Fellow and a Board Member of the American Psychotherapy Association. Bill is known for his storytelling, irreverent humor, clear and accessible style and his boundless enthusiasm for whatever he is doing. His seminars are as entertaining as they are educational.