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PNMA15-8Don’t Overthink Your Interventions

By Jay Efran and Rob Fauber

In our profession, it’s often more alluring to explore new gimmicks than to acknowledge that our success largely hinges on simple, commonsense factors.

PNMA15-7By William Doherty

To stay relevant in a changing world, we need to address the engagement styles of today’s prospective clients.

Let’s unite to stand up to vested interests that have taken over the mental health system.

Therapists are far more impressed with clinical fads than they should be.

Manualized psychotherapy is squeezing out people on the margins of mainstream society.

To move forward, our profession needs a more consistent message about what we have to offer.

It’s time we address the psychological toll of the daily bombardment of information that permeates our lives.

PNMA15-1Do Our Old Ways Fit the New Times?

By Mary Sykes Wylie

While the number of people in psychotherapy keeps declining, surveys reveal that potential clients would still rather talk to a therapist than fill a prescription. So what’s going on? We asked six of the field’s most outspoken leaders to offer their views.

Nurturing the seed of the specifically human capacity.

The capacity for rage, fear, and lust for dominance seem to be built into our genome. Although we like to think we’ve risen above our “animal” nature, all our efforts to demonstrate a high-enough rank in the social hierarchy by being richer, better looking, smarter, stronger, more powerful, or more popular than other people is just another way of carrying on the ancient struggle for survival. If we see ourselves as failing at that struggle and are left feeling anxious, depressed, and worthless, we may find ourselves with a therapist who specializes in helping people find their way out of these disturbing states of mind. But there are other perspectives on this struggle. Buddhists see the problem not as one of individual psychopathology, but as the result of maintaining our mistaken attachments—our deep desire for what we think we want and our deep suffering when we don’t get it.

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